pastorjohnb

Thoughts and musings on faith and our mighty God!


Leave a comment

Trust and Confidence

Reading: Psalm 138

Verse 8: “The Lord will fulfill God’s purpose for me; your love, O Lord, endures forever.”

This week’s Psalm is both a celebration of God’s deliverance and a rejoicing over God’s continued presence in all of life. David begins by praising God for God’s love and faithfulness. David celebrates the place of God’s name and of the words spoken by God. They are both “above all things.” There is nothing more worthy of our praise and adoration.

In verse 3 David acknowledges how God heard and answered his prayers. Because of this David has become “bold and stouthearted.” He is filled with trust and confidence in the Lord. We too experience these feelings when God answers our prayers. David then thinks outside of himself, praying that “all the kings of the earth” would know and praise God. David wants others to know his God, to be touched by the glory of the Lord.

As the Psalm closes, David brings it down to reality. Although God is great and mighty, “God looks upon the lowly.” God is concerned with the downtrodden and the outcast, with the orphan and the widow. The implication here is that we should be concerned too. What is on God’s heart should be on our heart. In verse 7 David recognizes that God is with him. Over and over God has preserved David’s life as he walks “in the midst of trouble.” Over and over, “with your right hand you saved me.” These experiences also build David’s trust and confidence in the Lord. Because of this, David can boldly proclaim, “The Lord will fulfill God’s purpose for me; your love, O Lord, endures forever.” God is with him; God is on David’s side. God’s love endured forever!

As we journey in faith we come to understand what David is proclaiming. As we walk long with God we too build a trust and confidence in God. And we, like David, are called to proclaim our faith in the Lord. May our witness in the world bring glory and honor to God, the one who is worthy of all of our praise.

Prayer: Lord, you are my redeemer and the rock of my salvation. Your constant presence leads and guides, protects and defends. You alone are worthy of my praise. Use me today to glorify your name. Amen.


Leave a comment

Faithful Ministers

Reading: Luke 4:21-30

Verse 28: “All the people in the synagogue were furious when they heard this.”

As we turn again to Luke 4, it seems things were going well with Jesus and the people of Nazareth. He teaches in the synagogue; they are impressed. Some there question. We usually assume their questioning was caused by doubt or skepticism. But maybe it was out of greed – imagine what Jesus could do for us, those of his own hometown! Maybe it was from a place of pride – how important we’ll be if Jesus stays here with us! Whatever was motivating their thoughts, it must’ve been evil or selfish. Jesus himself challenges their limited or errant thinking.

Jesus reminds the people of two Old Testament stories. One is of Elijah and the widow of Zarephath and the other is of Naaman the Syrian. Both stories were about God’s miraculous work in the lives of strangers, of pagans, of outsiders. Standing in his hometown, taking square aim at whatever evil thoughts were stirring inside of these folks, Jesus challenges them to see outside of themselves, to see beyond their own needs. They get what Jesus is saying. They become angry, even to the point of wanting to kill him.

When has the word of God or the example of Jesus or the nudge of the Holy Spirit or the voice of a pastor or friend challenged your understanding of who is worthy of God’s love or your willingness to see how all people are inside the circle of God’s love? In these moments sometimes our response is anger too. We can feel like circling the wagons instead of opening the circle for those people. We can try and ingore the voice telling us to reach out beyond the comfortable, working instead to maintain the status quo. Yet the feeling remains. The compassion, the empathy, the desire to love – it remains because God is there within us. As one of today’s devotionals reminded me: “Faithful ministry always looks for the outsider, the neglected, the oppressed.” Looking is an active, love filled, intentional effort. May we each be faithful ministers of the good news of Jesus Christ.

Prayer: Lord God, when I want to look down and pretend that they are not there, lift my eyes to see. When I want to keep them in that bubble, set apart and isolated, guide me to step within that place of isolation, bringing community. Once there, once present, move me to action, use me to love as Christ loves. Amen.


Leave a comment

Share the Love

Reading: Luke 4:21-30

Verse 22: “All spoke well of him and were amazed at the gracious words that came from his lips.”

Those around Jesus recognized the authority that he spoke with and they saw the power in his words and in his touch. Even though rejected in his hometown, Jesus’ message would make a great impact on our world for generations to come. Jesus and then later his followers would live out the words of wisdom Isaiah, meeting needs in all sorts of ways.

Today we continue in these ways. As followers of Jesus Christ we seek to be good news to all people, to bring healing and wholeness to people’s lives. Unlike Elijah – who kept oil and flour in adequate supply when many were starving – and unlike Elisha – whose simple instructions cured the incurable – we are but ordinary folk called to share the extraordinary love of God.

We share the love sometimes in basic ways: caring for a neighbor, giving to the needy, visiting the lonely. We can also share the love in braver ways: speaking against injustice, standing up for the exploited, giving voice to people’s concerns. In all things, may we always seek to love, shining Jesus’ light into the darkness of our world.

Prayer: Lord God, lead me to people and places where I can be your love in real and tangible ways. May that love improve lives, bringing much worthy and wholeness. Amen.


Leave a comment

More and More

Reading: 1st Corinthians 13:8-13

Verse 12: “Now we see but a poor reflection as in a mirror; then we will see face to face.”

Yesterday we looked at the first half of chapter 13, where God’s covenant love calls us to practice love in many ways. Practicing these do’s and don’ts empowers us to love one another well. Today’s passage begins with a bold statement: “Love never ends.” Paul is talking about love in a general sense, not about our own ability or capacity to follow the ideal set forth in verses 1-7. Since God is eternal, love is eternal.

As we get into the next portion of today’s text Paul reminds us that earthly things, even our gifts, will pass. Prophesies, speaking in tongues, knowledge – they will all cease. Maybe Paul is also saying that love is the thing that we will take with us into eternity. Or maybe love is what carries us on into eternity.

In verses 9-12 Paul speaks of the change within us as we practice and practice and practice loving well. As we mature in the living out of our faith, “the imperfect disappears.” Our childlike faith – the ways we talked, thought, acted – is gradually replaced with a maturing faith. In verse 12 Paul writes, “Now we see but a poor reflection as in a mirror; then we will see face to face.” Here and in the rest of the verse, yes, Paul is speaking about eternity, of when we transition into heaven. But this is also a process worked out here on earth. As we grow in our practice of love we see more and more of Jesus in ourselves and in others. We grow to love Jesus and neighbor more and more.

Paul closed by reminding us that in this process towards becoming more and more like Jesus we have faith, hope, and love. Faith in the one who loves us unconditionally, hope in the daily walk and in the life to come, and love to lead and guide us. The chapter closes with this statement: “The greatest of these is love.” How true. It is what we live out, revealing God to others. May we love well today.

Prayer: Lord God, fill me with your love. Make me more and more like Jesus each day. Work in me to see and love as Jesus did. Amen.


Leave a comment

Growing in Our Love

Reading: 1st Corinthians 13:1-7

Verse 7: “Love always protects, always trusts, always hopes, always perseveres.”

Today and tomorrow we will walk through 1st Corinthians 13. This passage is often used at weddings as it speaks of love in beautiful, flowing language. A wedding, however, was not Paul’s context for writing these words. This passage continues the topics of the past two week’s readings in chapter 12. Here Paul spoke of unity in the church and of using the gifts of the Holy Spirit to build the body of Christ and the kingdom of God. Paul ends chapter 12 with these words: “And now I will show you the most excellent way.” The way is the way of love.

In verses 1-3 Paul speaks of Christian values, practices, gifts done without love three times. Each time he states that any of these wonderful things done without love results in being or gaining nothing. Without love these things are like that lame, heartless apology we were forced to give as kids because mom or dad was making us say that we were sorry. Each time we heard something along the lines, “Say it like you mean it.” If we can speak in tongues or utter amazing prophecies but have not love, we gain nothing. If we know all about the Bible or if we have faith enough to move a mountain, but have not love, we gain nothing. Faith without love is simply going through the motions, like saying “sorry” when we didn’t really mean it. Love is what gives our faith and the practice of our faith roots, purpose, power.

In verses 4-7 Paul describes what ideal, God-like, covenant love is and is not. Even though there is a playfulness to Paul’s words here, there is also great meaning and power. Love should not be envious or boastful, proud or rude, petty or self-seeking. Note that all of these focus on self, on “me.” Instead, Paul calls us to the most excellent way. Love should be patient and kind, rejoicing in truth. Love should be “always protects, always trusts, always hopes, always perseveres.” Paul is calling us to love others as God loves us, as Jesus loved us. While our imperfect nature finds us falling short of this picture of covenant love, God’s covenant love always remains, always calls us back towards loving as God loves us. Day by day may we hear the call and respond, growing daily in our love for God and for one another.

Prayer: God, thank you for this beautiful and awesome reminder of your love and for your plan for how we are to love one another. Each day help my love to be more like your love. Amen.


Leave a comment

Today I Choose

Reading: Psalm 71:1-6

Verse 3: “Be my rock of refuge to which I can always go.”

Do you ever just want to cry or to crawl back in under the covers or to hunker down in your favorite chair to watch movies? The last three years have brought me to this place more than in all my other 52 years combined. Instead of just hearing or reading about the number of cases or deaths, now we all personally know people that are battling or have been lost to COVID. Most of us know several people currently affected. I don’t know about you, but today I needed to read Psalm 71.

Psalm 71 reminds us of what God offers to all who will walk in right relationship with the Lord. We can find refuge in God. We can trust that God will rescue and deliver us in righteousness. We can ask God to deliver us from the hand of evil. Some days, though, I just want to withdraw, to be alone. These days that feels safe, easy. In that place I don’t have to say that word or deal with decisions surrounding the pandemic.

Psalm 71 reminds me, reminds all who are struggling a bit, that God is still right there. It reminds us that God desires to be our refuge, our rescuer, our deliverer. Sometimes it takes a conscious, intentional decision to declare God our refuge… instead of saying, yes, God can be our refuge… This day I choose to live into these words of hope and promise. This day I choose to not walk alone. This day I choose to lean into God so that I can be caring and loving in my words, actions, and decisions. Today I choose to love because God is love.

Prayer: Lord God, I pray for all who are struggling a bit today. I lift up all who would rather just sit the day out. And I pray too for all who cannot sit it out: for the health care workers and others who have to show up, for those who sit another day by the bed of a sick loved one or who stand by the grave of a loved one lost. Pour out your love upon us, O God. Amen.


Leave a comment

Champion the Cause

Reading: Jeremiah 1:4-10

Verse 10: “I have appointed you over nations and kingdoms to uproot and tear down, to destroy and overthrow, to build and plant.”

Photo credit: Wylly Suhendra

Jeremiah was called by God to speak God’s word to the world. His voice did not just go out to the people of God. He also spoke to those who were negatively impacting the children of God. God called Jeremiah to speak against the corruption and injustices of Judah. God appointed Jeremiah “over nations and kingdoms to uproot and tear down, to destroy and overthrow, to build and plant.” This is a sweeping appointment.

Jeremiah was charged with uprooting and tearing down, with destroying and overthrowing. He was tasked with rooting out the causes of corruption and injustice and with tearing down the systems that perpetuated these evils. Jeremiah was led to destroy the sins that led to selfishness and to overthrow the systems of power that disenfranchised much of the population. God is clearly on the side of the poor and powerless. God sent Jeremiah to be God’s voice, championing their cause.

As I think about Jeremiah’s charge and our world today, I can’t but help think that God continues to call us to speak against the people and systems that are corrupt and against the acts of injustice and oppression that these create. God remains on the side of the poor and powerless, of the voiceless and marginalized. As in Jeremiah’s day there are plenty of self-centered and prideful leaders who are seeking to perpetuate and even create unjust systems that keep power in their hands. The ideals that were there at the founding of our nation – servant leadership, striving for the common good, equality and justice for all – seem to have been forgotten. Hand in hand, in many ways, we have forgotten our call to care for those without voice or power.

Just thinking about the small kingdom in which you dwell, what needs to be rooted out, what needs torn down? Is it corruption or is it racism or sexism or some other -ism? What needs destroyed or overthrown? Is it a lack of access to education or health care? Is it leaders focused on self and on gathering power and wealth? How can you and I champion the cause if our nation and of those who are powerless and voiceless?

Prayer: Lord God, heal our land. Let the healing begin with me. Let the planting and building up of what was of old – equality, justice, the common good, humble service – begin anew in our land. Give me eyes to see the systems that work against your vision for our world. Empower me to work against these sinful behaviors and against these harmful -isms. Heal our land, O Lord. Amen.


Leave a comment

God Calls

Reading: Jeremiah 1:4-10

Verse 5: “Before I formed you in the womb I knew you, before you were born I set you apart.”

In today’s passage we read about the call of Jeremiah the prophet. In the first few verses of Jeremiah 1 we learn that Jeremiah was a priest in a small town in the land of Benjamin when he was called. The Babylonian empire was nearing Israel and Judah. There was a great need for religious reform. King Josiah was trying to begin the needed reforms. A prophet was needed. God asked Jeremiah to fill this role.

For the past two weeks I’ve been writing and preaching about our gifts and how God wants us to use our gifts to share the good news and to build the kingdom of God. This call is very similar to the call that all prophets received, including Jeremiah. In verse five we read, “Before I formed you in the womb I knew you, before you were born I set you apart.” These words are true for you and me too. They are true for all people. Before anyone is knit together in the womb they are a thought in God’s mind. Before anyone is born, God has a plan for them. All people receive an invitation to live a life set apart for God. Many fight and reject and deny this invitation and the spark of the divine inside of them. Over time the spark grows dim, the call becomes fainter. Yet God continues to call.

When God called, Jeremiah found excuses. We do too. When God calls into our lives, nudging us to use our gifts, we often ignore it or try to get out of it. If we can’t ignore it we try and tell ourselves that we’re too busy, too old, too young, too inexperienced, too whatever. To the excuses of Jeremiah, God said “nonsense.” God says the same thing to our excuses. God formed us, set us apart, and appointed us for service in the kingdom of God.

Our world is a difficult place right now, one full of sorrow and suffering, one in deep need of God. As God calls us, may we follow, trusting in God’s leading and guidance.

Prayer: Lord God, the needs are many, the pain deep. Help me to see where you are pointing me, to go to those you want to send me to. Guide me to step out in trust. Use me as you will. Amen.


Leave a comment

A Constant Prayer

Reading: Psalm 19:14

Verse 14: “May the words of my mouth and the meditation of my heart be pleasing in your sight, O Lord, my rock and my redeemer.”

These words are probably familiar to you. This prayer of David is often recited just before the pastor or priest offers the message or sermon in church. This prayer invites God into the process and also reminds us who God is. Used this way, the prayer asks blessing on the words spoken and it invites the listeners’ hearts to a welcoming and receptive place. We are also reminded of two of God’s key characteristics. God is our rock, our foundation, our strength. Each time we give or receive the word of God, we are building on that rock. Each time we acknowledge that God alone is our salvation, we give or receive the word with thanksgiving and rejoicing in our heart. It is good to invite God into the process.

These words could also be used another way. What if they were not exclusive to sermon time? What if we used this prayer as a part of our everyday life? Imagine how different our interactions and our relationships would be. If we prayed these words before speaking at meetings and gatherings, before conversations with family and friends, before hitting “send,” imagine how our lives and world would change.

David used these words more in the everyday sense. It was a constant prayer, offered often. I invite you to consider using these words of prayer often too. Claim and live into these words in the week ahead. If they make a difference in your heart and in your relationships, keep using them. Blessings on the journey.

Prayer: God, help me to use these words more than just on Sunday morning. May this prayer become a regular part of my everyday life. Amen.


Leave a comment

Choose to Accept

Reading: 1st Corinthians 12:27-31a

Verse 27: “Now you are the body of Christ, and each of you is a part of it.”

Photo credit: Taylor Smith

Continuing today in 1st Corinthians 12 Paul concludes his call to unity. Paul once again reminds the church that all matter and that all have a role to play: “Now you are the body of Christ, and each of you is a part of it.” All of the people that make up the church in Corinth (or anyplace else) are valuable and essential parts of the whole. Paul is drawing them away from the comparison game that we so easily fall into.

It seems natural for us to compare ourselves to others. The world judges by quantity over quality so much of the time. Society equates the bigger house, the loftier title, the greatest number of followers and so on with success and power. It begins early in life. By about first grade we learn to look around to see who got the best score on the spelling test or we note who gets picked first in gym class. The comparison game only grows from there if left unchecked, if not countered.

After lifting up about 9 of possibly hundreds of roles played in the church, Paul points out that not all are teachers or administrators or… Not all are cooks or toilet cleaners or financial stewards or VBS shepherds or… And just as the body wouldn’t be what God designed it to be without ears or eyes or hands or feet or…, so too is the church best when each person being chooses to be a part of the body of Christ.

This mentality or belief that all matter, that all are valuable, is countercultural. This rule of life that Paul is preaching is rooted in the teachings given by and in the example set by Jesus. From the very people he recruited to the way he treated all he met to the humble acts of service he gave, Jesus was countercultural too. In our passage today Paul is calling us to this countercultural faith. May we choose to accept the invite and may we transform the world with it.

Prayer: Lord God, teach me to value all people and to see and help develop what makes them each an important part of the body of Christ. Amen.