pastorjohnb

Thoughts and musings on faith and our mighty God!


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Poured Out Prayers

Reading: Psalm 26

Verses 1-2: “Vindicate me, O Lord … I have trusted in the Lord without wavering. Test me, O Lord, and try me, examine my heart and my mind.”

Photo credit: Alex Woods

Today’s Psalm is one of lament, one of anguish, one of crying out to the Lord. We do not know the exact trial or time of suffering that David is going through, but we can feel his emotions and feelings. There is a sense of injustice or unfairness to these words. They are the sincere and honest words of a prayer poured out from the heart.

Reflecting on our readings from the past two days, these are certainly words that Job could have prayed. He was an “upright and blameless” man that endured tragedies that tested his faith. These are words that we have prayed (or will pray) too. Whenever we feel unjustly treated we too have prayed for vindication. Our sense of fairness is offended and we want God to fix it. We too have (or will) remind God of our unwavering faithfulness. It just doesn’t seem right for that thing to be happening to someone so faithful. And as a way to plead our case, to prove that we are worthy and deserving of God intervening on our behalf, we invite (or will invite) God to examine our heart, our mind, our faith. Surely the examination will reveal our worthiness to receive God’s action on our behalf.

Wouldn’t it be wonderful if we were truly upright and blameless, if our hearts could really withstand a millisecond of God’s inspection? We do live holy and devout lives for portions of time. David, Job, Elijah, Moses, Peter, John – all the ‘greats’ of the Bible – they all had their failures, their times when sin reared its ugly head. Only one person lived a perfect and sinless life. While upright and blameless is the goal as we follow Jesus, it is not anything we can achieve 100% of the time. In the same way, our prayers cannot be perfect. But they can be like David’s is today in Psalm 26: honest, sincere, heartfelt, desiring of God and God’s action in our lives. Our prayers, our desires, the hopes of our hearts – may we pour them out to the Lord our God, the one who loves to hear the children praying.

Prayer: Lord God, thank you for this honest look at prayer. It’s good to be reminded that you just love the conversation with us. It doesn’t have to be all beautiful and polished. That’s ok. But you want it as we feel it, as we honestly pour it out to you. Stammering, stumbling, halting, run-ons – none of that matters to you. Thank you for desiring and hearing our prayers just as they are, no matter what. Amen.


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Earnest Prayer

Reading: James 5: 17-20

Verse 20: “He prayed earnestly that it would not rain, and it did not rain on the land for three and a half years.”

Photo credit: Yusuf Evli

Today as we continue in James 5 we receive two examples of the power of prayer. The first comes from Elijah’s ministry. We read, “He prayed earnestly that it would not rain, and it did not rain on the land for three and a half years.” The prophet saw the great evils being done by King Ahab and he brought these words as a warning against this behavior and as a testimony to the power of God. This earnest prayer sought to turn Ahab and Israel away from idol worship and other evil practices. It was an honest and sincere plea to bring the people back to God. We too are called to lift such prayers. We too are called to pray prayers that bring others back to God.

This is what the second half of our passage calls us to. It turns Elijah’s prayer focus personal. James tells us that if we see a brother or sister in Christ drift, wander, fall away, sin… then we should “bring him [or her] back.” We do so by praying earnest prayers over this person and by lovingly reminding him or her of the power of God. We are told that by doing so we will “save him [or her] from death.” This saving is from a spiritual death, not necessarily a physical one. The act of returning to Christ will bring forgiveness and will “cover a multitude of sins” as that person is restored to a right relationship with our Lord and Savior.

The severe famine that resulted from Elijah’s earnest prayer leads to a showdown and the destruction of the prophets of two pagan gods (1 Kings 18). The people of Israel see God’s power and repent and turn back to God. Then rain falls on the land, revealing God’s love and mercy. When those we pray for and minister to see the power of God again, repent, and turn back to God, a healing rain washes away their sin and restored them too. As people of earnest prayer may we ever seek to draw others near to God, building the kingdom of God as we do.

Prayer: God of heaven and earth, give us the courage and conviction to speak truth into the lives of others and give us the humility and obedience to hear truth when spoken into our lives. May we be the iron that sharpens one another. May we be the love that draws others to you. Amen.


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Prayer Power

Reading: James 5: 13-16

Verse 16: “The prayer of a righteous man [or woman] is powerful and effective.”

Photo credit: Fuu J

As James closes his letter of action and encouragement to be “doers of the word” he turns to the practices of prayer and praise. In verse thirteen we are encouraged to pray when we are in trouble and to sing songs of praise when we are happy. Practicing our faith should simply be a regular and consistent aspect of all parts of our lives.

In the next verse James calls for the sick to seek out prayer and anointing from the elders of the church. The practices of coming together to pray, to lay hands on someone, to anoint them with healing oil – these are holy and sacred moments. Jesus promised, “where two or more are gathered in my name…” In these moments the Holy Spirit of Jesus Christ becomes present to and with us when we gather to pray, adding those prayers and that presence to ours.

James tells us that the sick will be saved and the sinners forgiven when we gather together and offer these communal prayers to God. These powerful moments of prayer are fueled by the Holy Spirit’s presence, yes, but they also require something of us. We first need to be willing to be vulnerable and transparent with one another. To confess our sins to one another or to lay out our need for healing requires trust and humility, grace and empathy. To be willing to enter into these prayer spaces is sometimes challenging and difficult. Therefore it is important for the elders of the church to model these prayer practices themselves, asking for prayer and then humbly bowing head and heart before the throne of God as others surround and cover them in prayer.

Today’s portion of James 5 closes with these words: “The prayer of a righteous man [or woman] is powerful and effective.” Our prayers are powerful and effective. They can change lives and bring transformation to brokenness, healing to pain, and comfort to the grieving. May we be known as people of prayer. Through our actions and practices may the world see the power of prayer.

Prayer: Lord God, open our eyes and hearts to the power of prayer. All things are possible for the God who desires good things for those who love and believe in the Lord. Help my prayers to reflect this truth. Amen.


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Earnest Prayer

Reading: Esther 7: 1-6 and 9-10

Verse 3: “Then Queen Esther answered, ‘If I have found favor with you… grant me my life… and spare my people.'”

Photo credit: Caleb Jones

This week our general focus will be on the power of prayer. Today’s passage is one that has been covered in prayer. Leading up to this interaction with King Xerxes, Esther and all the Jews in Susa have spent three days in prayer and fasting. The three days in prayer and fasting were to seek God’s blessing on Esther’s audience with the king.

Like many of us, Esther and the Jews had been driven to prayer because of a difficult hardship looming in the future. Because of a personal dispute, vengeance was to be extracted upon all of the Jews living in the kingdom. Esther had to choose between the comforts and security of being queen and risking that very life to possibly save her people. She was queen because the last one had been deposed. Questioning one of the king’s decrees could cost Esther her position and maybe even her life.

At times we may face a risky choice – to speak up or to question may cost us more than we may be willing to give. Yet we know the right decision to make. We see the right thing to do. What is it that leads us to do what we know we should do? When in these situations we should look to Esther’s example. She and her people went to God in earnest prayer. They also fasted to demonstrate their commitment to nothing but prayer to God. The God of justice heard their prayers, encouraged the one who could act, and guided her through the difficult conversation.

When the Spirit stirs in us, raising up a cause or concern to bring to the Lord, may we too seek the power of prayer, trusting in the Lord our God.

Prayer: Lord God, thank you for this example of faith and courage and trust in you. All was lived out by bathing it in prayer. Lord, draw me to my knees over and over again. Amen.


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Better Is One Day

Reading: Psalm 84: 5-12

Verse 10: “Better is one day in your courts than a thousand elsewhere”.

Photo credit: Kunj Parekh

Today’s portion of Psalm 84 begins with acknowledging the blessings and strength that can come from God. The psalmist identifies those “who have set their heart” on a journey with God as the recipients of blessing and strength. As struggles come, as we walk through the valley, the Lord our God will strengthen us over and over – “strength upon strength”. One way that we set our hearts on God and open ourselves up to God through prayer. This is what the psalmist is talking about in verses eight and nine: “Hear my prayer… listen to me… look with favor on your anointed one”. In these words we can sense the depth of relationship between God and this faithful servant. It is a relationship and connection that the psalmist values deeply.

In verse ten we read, “Better is one day in your courts than a thousand elsewhere”. The writer of this Psalm would rather have just one day in God’s house than many, many days elsewhere – Vegas, LA, New York, New Orleans, the Alps, the Riviera, the Grand Canyon, Moab, Vale… What place would you add to this list? No matter the earthly place the reality is that one day in God’s house, whether that is here on earth or one day in heaven, can be better than one thousand days anywhere else. Imagine feeling that way about a Sunday at church. That is how the psalmist really feels. How can we get to such a place in our faith life?

We get to such a place the same way that the psalmist got there – walking faithfully day after day, keeping our heart set on the journey deeper and deeper into God’s love. The psalmist got there by drawing close to God in prayer and by trusting God to respond to his prayers. He got there by striving to walk blamelessly and by looking to God for all things and in all things. Faith is a long, slow, and steady journey. As we continue this journey of faith, may we come to live and believe that one day in God’s presence is truly better than a thousand days any other place.

Prayer: Lord God, what faith is exhibited by the psalmist. I love being at church, delving into your word, serving you with my whole heart. But one day for a thousand elsewhere? Forgive me, Lord – I have a ways to go. Day by day draw me deeper in. Call me over and over to your love. Thank you for your faithfulness and patience, O God. Amen.


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A Part of God’s Work

Reading: 1st Kings 2:10-12 and 3:3-14

Verse 9: “Give your servant a discerning heart to govern your people and to distinguish right from wrong”.

Photo credit: Ben White

Our passage begins with David’s passing and burial. David has reigned for forty years. He was and still is revered as the greatest king ever in Israel’s long history. Solomon has grown up during David’s reign. He has probably heard of many of David’s exploits and achievement’s – Goliath, all the battles won… Maybe even more daunting is the knowledge that David was a “man after God’s own heart”. Although he was not perfect, David was well known for his deep connection to God. Solomon has some pretty big shoes to fill.

As we turn to chapter three we see that Solomon has some of David in him – for good and for bad. Solomon “walked according to the statutes” of God. But he also “offered sacrifices and burnt offerings on the high places”. Solomon allowed the pagan influences in his life to lead him to also worship other gods. Like his father, Solomon was not perfect either. Yet Solomon does go to Gibeon to offer sacrifices to God. There he offers 1,000 burnt offerings, seeking to please God with his gift. God appears to Solomon in a dream and offers: “Ask for whatever you want me to give you”. What an offer!

What would you ask for? Young and inexperienced and brand new to the throne, following the great King David – if you were Solomon – what would you ask for? Power and fame? Riches? Protection from the enemies all around you? To rule a long time? All of these things would be temptations for me. Hear again Solomon’s request: “Give your servant a discerning heart to govern your people and to distinguish right from wrong”. Solomon asks for wisdom as a leader and to be able to know right from wrong. Solomon wants to please God and to be a good king for God’s family. God is pleased with Solomon’s request.

There are times when we go to God with our prayer requests. When challenging times present themselves, when we are uncertain, when we are facing a hard transition – how do we pray to God? Do we pray for power over our enemies or for success in the transition? Do we seek fame and fortune from God? Or do we ask for God to lead and guide us, to show us the way that is pleasing in God’s sight? May we be like Solomon, recognizing our small place in God’s grand scheme of things – even if we are “king” – and in humility seek to be a part of God’s work in the world. Our God is faithful. May we be as well.

Prayer: Lord, it can be tempting to seek power and authority, to desire victory over our enemies. Grant me a faithful spirit and eyes that see as you see. Bend my will ever to yours, O Lord. Amen.


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Rooted in Love

Reading: Ephesians 3: 14-21

Verses 17-18: “I pray that you, being rooted and established in love… grasp how wide and long and high and deep is the love of Christ”.

Photo credit: Emma Gossett

Chapter 3 of Ephesians opens with Paul declaring himself a “prisoner” of Jesus Christ for the sake of the Gentiles. Those he once saw as so far outside of God’s love have been brought near. Paul is now the primary missionary to the Gentiles. What an amazing turnaround! Our passage today is a prayer for the Ephesians. It begins with Paul on his knees.

Ephesus was a city much like the cities and towns that we live in. The culture of Paul’s day valued wealth and status and power. Life was centered around getting more and more. The world in which these early believers lived and the audience with whom they were sharing the good news was not much different from our own contexts. Paul first prays for the Holy Spirit’s power to fill them and to strengthen their inner being. Paul asks God to make them sure of who they are in Christ Jesus.

Paul then prays, “I pray that you, being rooted and established in love… grasp how wide and long and high and deep is the love of Christ”. Perhaps thinking of the parable of the sower found in Matthew 13, Mark 4, and Luke 8, Paul prays for deep roots of faith. When trouble or persecution or the cares of the world rise up, Paul prays that they will remain rooted in the love of Jesus Christ. He prays for them to understand the vastness and limitless nature of God’s love. Knowing this, they will be filled with the “measure of the all the fullness of God”. They will be filled with his love. Being filled, they will then overflow into the world. May it be so for you and for me.

Prayer: God of love, fill me, fill me, fill me. Pour out your love upon me. Fill me so full that your love washes away all that keeps me from being fully yours. Amen.


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Run to Meet Jesus

Reading: Mark 6: 53-56

Verse 56: “They begged him to let them touch even the edge of his cloak, and all who touched him were healed”.

Photo credit: Sarah Berriman

Once again as the boat lands, a crowd gathers. Mark tells us that the people “ran throughout that whole region” as they rushed to bring the sick to wherever Jesus was. As Jesus traveled to villages or towns and as he was simply out in the countryside, crowds of people came to Jesus. In these ongoing encounters, Jesus remains compassionate and loving, meeting all people as they were and where they were at. He welcomed one and all.

Jesus continues to meet us as we are and where we are at in life. He meets us when we are tired and worn. He meets us in the joys and celebrations. Jesus meets us when we feel all alone and when we gather for worship or study or prayer. He meets us wherever and whenever. In verse 56 we read that those who came “begged him to let them touch even the edge of his cloak”. They knew that even such a brief encounter would bring healing and wholeness. All were healed.

Jesus continues to meet us as we are and where we are. This day may we too run to meet Jesus. There we can find healing and wholeness, compassion and love.

Prayer: Lord God, your love astounds me. No matter how I am when I come to you, you love me. Your compassion amazes me. No matter what I’ve done, you welcome me into your presence. There you cover me in your grace and peace, making me whole again. Thank you, Lord. Amen.


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Run to Meet Jesus

Reading: Mark 6: 53-56

Verse 56: “They begged him to let them touch even the edge of his cloak, and all who touched him were healed”.

Photo credit: Sarah Berriman

Once again as the boat lands, a crowd gathers. Mark tells us that the people “ran throughout that whole region” as they rushed to bring the sick to wherever Jesus was. As Jesus traveled to villages or towns and as he was simply out in the countryside, crowds of people came to Jesus. In these ongoing encounters, Jesus remains compassionate and loving, meeting all people as they were and where they were at. He welcomed one and all.

Jesus continues to meet us as we are and where we are at in life. He meets us when we are tired and worn. He meets us in the joys and celebrations. Jesus meets us when we feel all alone and when we gather for worship or study or prayer. He meets us wherever and whenever. In verse 56 we read that those who came “begged him to let them touch even the edge of his cloak”. They knew that even such a brief encounter would bring healing and wholeness. All were healed.

Jesus continues to meet us as we are and where we are. This day may we too run to meet Jesus. There we can find healing and wholeness, compassion and love.

Prayer: Lord God, your love astounds me. No matter how I am when I come to you, you love me. Your compassion amazes me. No matter what I’ve done, you welcome me into your presence. There you cover me in your grace and peace, making me whole again. Thank you, Lord. Amen.


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My Rock, My Salvation

Reading: 1st Samuel 17: 1a, 4-11, 19-23, and 32-49

Verse 45: “I come against you in the name of the Lord Almighty”.

We return today to the story of David and Goliath. Standing before Saul, David expresses his faith in God, saying, “he has defied the armies of the living God”. David knows that the battle now belongs to the Lord. With that knowledge and his faith in God, David is willing to face the giant.

Sometimes our giants work us into a place of fear. After time we want to withdraw. Goliath came day after day for forty days, defying God and the army of Israel over and over. In our recent communal history COVID was like this. Every day COVID shouted at us, defied our health care systems, made us want to withdraw. No matter what we as a nation did, it raged on day after day. As a nation and as individuals we faltered, we doubted, we feared. And many chose to lean into God, into our faith. In our quiet places we opened our Bibles. In our homes we knelt and opened our hearts to God. In faith we found hope and peace, strength and comfort.

As David meets Goliath, the giant rails against David and against God. He curses David by his gods and threatens his life. David correctly identifies that all Goliath has is a sword, spear, and javelin. These weapons are harmful and even deadly, just as COVID or any other serious illness is. Yet all these are powerless against God, our hope and our eternity. David declares, “I come against you in the name of the Lord Almighty”. We know how this battle turned out.

As we face our giants, may we too remember that God is on our side, that we do not fight alone. Anointed by God’s Spirit, we belong to the Lord.

Prayer: Living God, give me a confident faith, a trusting faith. As the world trots out its giants, may I ever stand upon my rock and my salvation. Amen.