pastorjohnb

Thoughts and musings on faith and our mighty God!


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Old and Blessed

Reading: Job 42: 10-17

Verse 17: “And so he died, old and full of years.”

As we conclude our time in Job it seems we’ve come full circle. By the end of our reading, Job’s fortunes and family have been restored in abundance. In verse twelve we read, “The Lord blessed the latter part of Job’s life more than the first.” On the surface this is true. But to dig a little deeper reveals that much has changed.

Job is very different than when this journey began. As I wrote about yesterday, the eye of Job’s heart now sees God for who God is. The God that he thought he knew in his mind has become fully present in his heart. The pain and grief that Job walked through may have subsided a bit but the hurt will always be there. The love for his first children will not be replaced by his new children. For example, when Jemimah reminds him of one of his daughters who died, tears will flow and his heart will ache. Job does move forward with his life, one very blessed by God, but he does so with deep scars. Job himself has been changed too. He now more fully understands God and the love of God for all parts of creation – from the ravens God feeds to his friends that God rebukes in verses 7-9.

Modeling the love of God that Job himself now fully knows, he prays for his friends. Previous to his time of suffering this may have been too much to ask of Job’s surface level faith. The faith that only resided in his mind and that was driven by a fear of punishment would have struggled to pray for these men who added to his suffering. The Job whose heart sees the full scope of God’s love and mercy easily prays for these friends. It is a love and mercy that Job wants them to know as well. So Job ministers to his friends. This is a much different Job than the one who made his first set of children offer sacrifices for their possible bad behavior. Job now offers his friends forgiveness and a new relationship with God from a place of love, not fear. Walking with God in a loving and intimate relationship, our story concludes with these words: “And so he died, old and full of years.” Old and full of years. Old and blessed because of a personal relationship with God. May it be so for you and for me!

Prayer: Lord God, it’s awesome that Job was totally restored and then some. The true blessing was the personal and intimate relationship with you. Possessions, titles, money, popularity – all nice but none are guarantees of a good life. A life that is good and pleasing to you is one that is full of love, peace, hope, joy, grace, forgiveness, kindness, mercy, contentment… Guide me to these treasures, O Lord. Amen.


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Deeper, Stronger

Reading: Job 42: 1-6

Verse 5: “My ears had heard of you but now my eyes see you.”

Job has lived a righteous and upright life. God allowed Satan to test Job’s faith. He remained faithful. Job’s wife and friends add to his suffering with accusations and condemnations. Job longs to have an audience with God, to state his case. God responds to Job in a long speech that leaves Job humbled and with a new understanding of God. Today we read Job’s response.

Job begins by acknowledging that God “can do all things” and that “no plan of yours can be thwarted.” Job has taken in the immensity of God’s power and the depth of God’s creative might. In the complexity of the created world and in the detailed order of animal life, God has done some amazing and awesome work. God speaks of the behemoth and the leviathan – two creatures with great power that are feared by humanity. These creatures are far outside of man’s control but well within God’s. God asks, “Can you make a pet of him?” No, God, certainly not. In response Job says, “Surely I spoke of things I did not understand, things too wonderful for me.” Job recognizes his place in God’s world. Along with all of humanity, Job realized that he was not the center of all things.

Job has been changed by this encounter with God. In reality Job knew God and followed God’s ways at least as well as any other human being on the earth. God lifted him up to Satan as an example of faith. But as God spoke out of the whirlwind, Job came to know God in a deeper and more intimate way. In verse five Job declares, “My ears had heard of you but now my eyes see you.” Job had worshiped and followed a God that he thought was powerful, awesome, worthy of his praise. Now Job sees God in a clearer way. Job now knows that God is all these things and so much more. His connection to God is now so much deeper, so much more profound, so much stronger. Job’s faith in God has grown. As we delve into the word, as we allow the Holy Spirit to lead and guide our lives, as we strive to follow Jesus’ example, our faith will grow deeper, the connection will become stronger. May it be so as we walk closely with the Lord our God day by day.

Prayer: Lord God, like Job, the more I know you, the longer I walk with you, the more awed and amazed I become. My faith journey has been filled with moments when I’ve come to know you more intimately, to love you more deeply, to praise you more sincerely. Continue to journey with me, ever allowing my eyes and heart to see and know you more clearly. Amen.


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Walking with Others

Reading: Psalm 34: 1-8

Verse 2: “My soul will boast in the Lord; let the afflicted hear and rejoice.”

Having narrowly escaped his encounter with King Achish, David writes this Psalm. (For more detail on this event read 1st Samuel 21: 10-15.) David could’ve written about how clever he was to escape this dangerous situation. He could’ve celebrated outsmarting an enemy. David does not do any of this. David correctly identifies the source of the guidance that led him past this dangerous place: God.

The Psalm begins with praise. David extols God, boasts about God, and glorifies God. He is so thankful. But don’t miss the second half of verse two. It begins with, “My soul will boast in the Lord.” This is the ‘what.’ The second half is the ‘why’: “Let the afflicted hear and rejoice.” David writes to let others who find themselves in a dangerous situation to know that God is good, powerful, and on their side too. David shares his experience of when God rescued him so that others can trust God to do the same for them. In verse four David writes, “I sought the Lord, and the Lord answered me; the Lord delivered me from my fears.” He is giving witness to God’s protection and guidance.

The reality is that we who have walked a while with the Lord also have stories of God’s intervention in our lives. We can all identify times when God rescued us, when God guided us through, when God saved us… Now you or I might not write a beautiful Psalm to express these experiences, but we are still called to share our stories of faith. As we too praise and witness to our faith and to the power and might of God, we help others to “taste and see that the Lord is good.” Doing so we will help others to experience how “blessed is the man [or woman] who takes refuge in the Lord.” As God presents opportunities to walk with others in faith may we make the most of them, drawing others deeper into relationship with God.

Prayer: Lord God, we never like the valleys that we walk through at times. These times that are just part of life are often times and places of growth in our faith. They become opportunities to help others walking a similar valley. Empower and use us to see the opportunities and to trust into you as we witness to our faith experiences as we walk alongside another, reminding them of your love and power, of your grace and might. Amen.


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Over and Over

Reading: Psalm 34: 19-22

Verse 22: “The Lord redeems his servants; no one will be condemned who takes refuge in God.”

Photo credit: Brett Jordan

Psalm 34 comes from David and is a celebration of when God rescued him from Abimelech, a foreign king. David praises God for rescuing him and redeeming him from his troubles. The concepts of redemption and restoration run throughout the Bible and throughout this week’s readings. These concepts bring all believers hope in this life.

Leading into this Psalm, David finds himself in a tough situation – powerless before a powerful king. David is fleeing from King Saul and finds himself surrounded by this Philistine king and his troops. (In 1st Samuel 21 the king is identified as Achish.) God leads David to pretend to be totally insane. The king sees that David is no threat to anyone and sends this madman away. We read David’s praise in verse nineteen: “A righteous man may have many troubles, but the Lord delivers him from them all.” David had gone on from slaying Goliath to winning many victories for King Saul. In his own true insanity, Saul became very jealous and wanted to kill David. Having only served faithfully, David now finds himself in trouble. Once again, God delivers him from trouble. David was also faithful to God, obediently doing as God directed.

We too are called to faithful, obedient living. We too are invited to listen for God’s voice, seeking God’s guidance and direction. When we do these things we are not guaranteed an easy, trouble-free life. We are promised God’s presence in all of life. Over and over David walked faithfully with God. This leads him to speak these words in verse 22: “The Lord redeems his servants; no one will be condemned who takes refuge in God.” May it be so for you and for me.

Prayer: Lord God, in the lows of life I frequently turn to you. There I know I need you. In the good days and even in the OK days my focus can so easily shift a bit. Focus me at all times on an obedient and faithful walk. Help me to be intentional about my walk with you. Amen.


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Called by God

Reading: Hebrews 10: 1-10

Verse 4: “No one takes this honor upon himself [or herself]; he [or she] must be called by God.”

Photo credit: Jeremy Perkins

Today’s passage begins with the traditional role of the priest in ancient Judaism. Called from the Levites, a priest represented the people “in matters related to God.” This included offering prayers and sacrifices as they dealt “gently” with those who were “ignorant” or “going astray.” The priests were human beings too, so they were sinful and offered sacrifices for their own sins.

In verse four the author of Hebrews shifts to Jesus. Quoting from two Psalms, the writer identifies Jesus as one appointed by God to be the high priest forever. Like the Levite priests, Jesus offered up prayers and petitions to God. He was heard by God because of his “reverent submission” to God. We are also reminded of Jesus’ final suffering on the cross, through which he “became the source of eternal salvation for all who obey him.” Jesus was without sin. This enabled him to be the final and perfect sacrifice in humanity’s battle with sin.

Where do we fit in this priesthood? We are not from the line of Levi – the traditional qualification for being a priest. This is no longer a prerequisite in Judaism either. We are also sinful, far from perfect. We all deal with sin regularly in our own lives. Therefore we all fall short of role of “great high priest” given to Jesus. Even though we do not fit either of these categories, we are all called by God to be priests or ministers of the gospel. We are all called to offer prayers and petitions for ourselves and for others. We are all called to reverent submission to God. We are all called to suffer for our faith at times. We are all called to help one another on our walks if faith, gently and lovingly helping those who have gone astray. We are weak and sinful, offering the sacrifice of repentance to be redeemed from our sins. Through Jesus Christ’s gift on the cross we who believe claim eternal life.

The moment we claim Jesus Christ as our Lord and Savior we are called by God to be a witness to our faith. We do not take this calling upon ourselves. Called by God and commissioned by Jesus, we are charged with making disciples for the transformation of the world. Called, we follow in Christ’s footsteps, carrying the good news to all we meet.

Prayer: Lord God, use me each day to share the good news of Jesus Christ. Use my words, my actions, my thoughts, and my witness to draw others into your light and love. Amen.


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Giving, Not Taking

Reading: Mark 10: 41-45

Verse 43: “Whoever wants to become great among you must be your servant.”

Photo credit: Lina Trochez

As we continue in Mark 10 we first see that the other disciples are “indignant” with James and John. They are mad about what James and John asked of Jesus. Is it because they have been watching Jesus closely and better understand what his kingdom is all about? Is it because they are naturally less power hungry? Is it because they didn’t think to ask first? Their anger could come from any of these roots or from many other angles. The world has had 2,000 years to ponder Jesus’ example and we’ve had 56 or 84 or 23 years to figure it out and we still struggle with the kingdom of God’s take on power.

The disciples see power as physical strength and control, as political or religious dominance, as a hierarchy even within the small group of twelve that closely follows Jesus. We too struggle with notions of power. They may vary depending on our age and in our stage in life, but we all wrestle with pride, ego, control… to some degree or another for most of our lives. Jesus reminds the disciples how much they dislike the ways that the current leaders “lord” their power over others. The Romans, the Pharisees and Sadducees, the tax collectors… all exert power in ways that negatively impact their subjects. He says, “Not so with you.” Don’t be like others with power. Be counter-cultural. Be like Jesus’ example. “Whoever wants to become great among you must be your servant.” Humble yourself and live a life of serving. Be about giving, not taking.

To drive home the point Jesus invites the disciples to look once again upon the one speaking to them: “the Son of Man did not come to be served but to serve.” If the one who could command the angels with a word chooses to give instead of take, if the one who chose to give his life “as a ransom for many” chooses humble servanthood, what better choice could we make? As opportunity arises may we choose to give instead of taking.

Prayer: Lord God, there are opportunities to give all the time. It can be time, resources, talent, prayers. When opportunity comes my way, when the Holy Spirit nudges me, make me faithful, make me a humble servant. Help me to closely follow the example of Jesus. Amen.


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Can you…?

Reading: Mark 10: 35-40

Verse 35: “Teacher, we want you to do for us whatever we ask.”

Photo credit: Noah Silliman

After clearly hearing what lies ahead for Jesus in verses 33 and 34 – condemned, mocked, spit upon, flogged, killed – James and John come to Jesus with a request. They preface it with “do for us whatever we ask.” It seems like they have something really important on their minds. Turns out to be so – they want the seats of glory in heaven. Did they miss the part about being condemned…?

Instead of getting angry or frustrated, Jesus is patient. Explaining the cost of discipleship another way he asks if they can “drink the cup” or be “baptized” as he will be. They say “we can” even though they have no idea what they will face. James and John will drink the cup of suffering and rejection and mocking. They will be baptized by the fires of persecution. Jesus assures them that they will indeed be able to pay the high price of discipleship. But, alas, he cannot grant their request – God already has those seats filled.

Those of us who have been part of a faith community for very long understand the cost of discipleship. We’ve given or heard lots of sermons about loving others more than self, about taking up our cross, about dying to self, about being generous and serving others. We’ve been through enough Easters to be aware of the high price Jesus paid to break the chains of sin and death. We feel perfectly comfortable, as James and John did, to ask Jesus about or for anything – from small requests to really big prayers. But are we willing to drink the cup and to be baptized as Jesus and the early disciples and apostles were? I fully realize that it is not in the slightest way a ‘quid pro quo’ situation, but there is clearly a cost to discipleship as Jesus clearly lays out in today’s passage and in many others.

Maybe your first thought, like mine when I read James’ and John’s question, was something like: How could you ask that?! If so, may we spend a little more time with Jesus’ question: Can you…?

Prayer: Lord God, it’s easy to walk a surface level faith. It’s easy to show up on a Sunday and maybe to a small group once a week or so. It’s another thing to be willing to suffer and to endure persecution, to pay a price for my faith. Lord, move me closer to this sacrificial and fully committed faith. Amen.


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Awed

Reading: Job 38: 34-41

Verse 35: “Do you send the lightning bolts on their way? Do they report to you, ‘Here we are'”?

Photo credit: Micah Tindell

I really enjoy a good storm. My wife likes it best when I observe them from afar. When the conditions are just right a big storm will form. I prefer when this happens to the north currently because there is a large picture window in the living room that faces that way. There is usually thunder that comes with the lightning. Both are powerful reminders of the energy in the natural world. The incredible force behind this power is the creator, God. From a distance the bolts of lightning spider web across the sky, reminding me of God’s power and might. A big bolt of lightning can light up the sky from east to west – as far as the eye can see.

As God continues to speak to Job in today’s passage, the questions remain unanswerable. No, Job cannot make it rain. No, Job cannot harness the lightning bolts. No, Job is not the giver of wisdom. No, Job cannot provide food for the wild animals. This line of questioning will continue for chapters 39, 40, and 41. Job will not be able to answer one of God’s questions. When Job stated in chapter nine that a mortal “could not answer God one time out of a thousand” how right he was! The same is true for us. Not one of us could intelligibly answer even one of God’s questions in these four chapters. So, what does this part of the book of Job say to our faith?

I love to watch the lightning and to hear the thunder that emerged from a lightning bolt. It is beautiful. It is awesome. Again, it reminds me of the power of God. What I really enjoy, though, is to be close to a storm. When it rolls down the valley and gets close (and if my wife isn’t home), I like to step outside. There I can feel the power in the storm. I am no closer to calling or sending the lightning, but it feels like I am more in God’s presence. Job could not answer any of God’s questions but he knew God better and more intimately because he was in God’s presence. I cannot recommend that you go stand under a tree in the next lightning storm but I can recommend drawing close to God. Today take a few minutes to read and to marinate in chapters 38-41 in Job. Like standing near a good lightning storm you will be awed by God’s power and might. I’d say reading Job 38-41 is safer, but it might not be.

Prayer: Lord God, draw me into your power. Draw me into your might. Humble me in your presence. In these ways may I walk closer to you. Amen.


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Holding Onto the Promises

Reading: Job 38: 1-7

Verse 2: “Who is this that darkens my counsel with words without knowledge?”

As we continue in the book of Job, God speaks out of the whirlwind. There is not a storm brewing in Uz. The power of God’s voice creates the whirlwind. God addresses Job and possibly his ‘friends’ who have offered ‘consolation’ and ‘advice.’ All of the human characters in the story operate from this understanding of blessed and curses: please God and be blessed; sin or anger God and be cursed. The friends assume that Job’s circumstances are the result of his sin(s). Job is positively confused. He feels unjustly cursed because he knows that he did not sin.

Verses one through seven begin a long soliloquy where God asks Job a series of questions. It begins with this question in verse two: “Who is this that darkens my counsel with words without knowledge?” This warning of a question is followed with “Brace yourself.” This line of questioning will not be a walk in the park. Today’s questions from God ask Job if he was there when God laid the earth’s foundation. God asks if Job knows what the footings of the earth are. “Tell me if you understand” God says. Job cannot answer these questions. He was not there nor does he have any source of knowledge that could answer these questions. But even more so, Job is humbled by God’s line of questioning. These questions and those that continue through chapter 41 remind Job, his friends, and us that we do not possess divine power and wisdom. God’s wisdom most often stands beyond our limits. God’s plans often escape our logic. God is God. It is good to be reminded of this. Often. It keeps us seeing faith and the world from the right perspective.

We know that God’s ultimate plan is to restore all things, to make all things new. One day there will be a new heaven and a new earth. When the path towards these promises becomes unclear or maybe doesn’t make sense to us, may we remember that God is God and that God loves us and wants justice and reconciliation for us. Holding onto these promises may we walk forward in faith.

Prayer: Lord God, when I want to question, when I want to shout ‘Why?!’, when I begin to doubt your love and care for me – remind me of my right place in our relationship. My wisdom, my understanding, my knowledge is but a speck in the vastness of your universe. Into this reality of your power and might and wisdom I put my trust and my faith. Amen.


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Created

Reading: Psalm 104: 1-9, 24, and 35c

Verse 1: “O Lord my God, you are very great: you are clothed with splendor and majesty.”

Photo credit: Greg Rakozy

The psalmist is awed by God’s power and might. In verse one the author declares: “O Lord my God, you are very great: you are clothed with splendor and majesty.” There is a deep love for God that runs throughput this Psalm.

In the first few verses the psalmist sees God’s power and might in the heavens – in the lights, in the clouds, in the winds, and in the lightning. When one takes in the vastness of the stars and watches how the world works so intricately and precisely, just as God designed and created it, one cannot help being awed by God.

In the second set of verses the author reflects on God’s creative power and full control over the created world. God set the foundations of the earth and then established mountains and seas, valleys and rivers. All of our world was created, sculpted by the words and thoughts of God. In the opening nine verses the psalmist echoes much of the feeling found in the creation story of Genesis 1.

When one takes in these verses it’s easy to understand why the psalmist calls God “very great” and why he or she recognizes God as “clothed with splendor and majesty.” But why did God create and design as God did? In verse 24 we read, “The earth is full of your creatures.” All that God did was out of love for the creation. God’s final act in the creation story was to create humanity – that part of creation that God deemed “very good.” Created in God’s image we are the centerpiece of creation and of God’s love. Made in God’s image, we are created to reflect God’s love out into the world.

Our Psalm closes with these words: “Praise the Lord, O my soul. Praise the Lord.” In our day today, in all we think and say and do, may we praise the Lord, bringing all the glory to God.

Prayer: O God of power and might, of majesty and splendor, this day I praise your creativity and your love. All this – the vastness of creation, the amazing design – all this for those you created in your image. As one who bears that image, may I love all of creation well this day. Amen.