pastorjohnb

Thoughts and musings on faith and our mighty God!


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God Answers

Reading: 1st Samuel 1: 12-20

Verse 17: “Go in peace, and may the God of Israel grant you what you have asked of him.”

Photo credit: Jakob Braun

Hannah has prayed and prayed. She has prayed for years and years for a child. She remained barren. She has prayed and prayed for relief from Peninnah’s taunts and cruelty. The pain and hurt persists. Yet year after year she prays. It can be hard to continue to pray day after day, never mind year after year.

Back when I went into pastoral ministry there was a building that I would walk around and pray over. Originally it was a car dealership and most recently the hospital’s laundry facility. The hospital decided to build a modern laundry facility on the hospital grounds. The land-locked church that I was a part of was next to this building. I would walk along the building, running my hand along the bricks, praying for God to use this space for the church’s growing ministries. Day after day I’d walk and pray. Teams and other individuals from the church would also do prayer walks around the building. Eventually the new space was ready and the hospital began to vacate the building. The lead pastor and I were able to walk around inside the space, beginning to dream of what could be. Each day I would prayer walk around the building. The church even contacted the hospital to express our interest. Day after day, month after month, praying.

Hannah prayed and prayed. One day she is praying in the temple. Pouring out her heart would be more accurate. The priest Eli notices. After some conversation he is moved by her anguish and grief. He blessed her, saying, “Go in peace, and may the God of Israel grant you what you have asked of him.” God responds to her prayers and to the blessing – she has a son. God’s timing aligned with Hannah’s prayers. God made a way forward.

One random day two men walked into the church. They let us know that they had bought the building and were going to start a new microbrewery. Gut punch. Hurt, anger, despair, doubt – these were the initial feelings. There might have even been a few sideways glances cast heavenward. Then the walking and praying resumed. As I walked along, touching the bricks, I prayed that God would one day use the space for ministry. I acknowledged that God’s plans are bigger than my plans, that God’s ways are higher than my ways. Although ministry has moved me on to other churches and other prayer focuses, when I’m back in the neighborhood, I sometimes still lift a prayer to God when I pass by that building and run my hand along the bricks. Our God still answers big, bold prayers. God did for Hannah. God will for you and for me.

Prayer: Lord God, you are faithful and true, loving and generous. Continue to lead and guide the ministries of your church. Continue to lead us to dream dreams and to see visions. Keep us ever at work building your kingdom here on earth. Amen.


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The Way

Reading: Psalm 1

Verse 6: “For the Lord watches over the way of the righteous, but the way of the wicked will perish.”

Photo credit: Niko Photos

Our week begins with Psalm 1 – a look at living a life that is righteous or living a life that is wicked. In the Psalm it feels like an either/or choice. In reality, though, this Psalm represents our both/and. We desire to “meditate day and night” on the word of God, but we are at times like “chaff” – blown this way and that way by the cares of the world.

For the psalmist, the one who is blessed does not listen to the counsel of wicked and avoids the ways of sinners and mockers. Instead, the one who is blessed seeks God’s counsel. Doing so, the righteous are like trees planted by streams. The waters of God’s word nourishes the soul as roots are sunk deep into God’s ways. This nourishment then produces good fruit, spreading God’s ways. In contrast, the wicked do not have this foundation. The wicked are blown this way and that, pursuing the shifting ways of the world. The outcome of these choices is stated in verse six: “For the Lord watches over the way of the righteous, but the way of the wicked will perish.”

We all want to be righteous, to stand on the right side of the line come judgment time. We all want to be seen as a tree, standing firm in our faith, making new disciples as the fruit we bear. But at times the counsel of the world steals into our ears and minds, influencing us, tempting us. We can be drawn into the “way of sinners.” Maybe this is ‘just’ joining the gossip circle or maybe this is unethical business practices that allow us to keep up with the Joneses. It is not always easy to navigate the Jesus way because the world 🌍 offers lots of off ramps. Being human, once in a while we take them.

Yet the promise remains: “the Lord watches over the way of the righteous.” When we stray, when we stumble, God provides a way, drawing us back into right relationship. This too is a choice. At this intersection may we choose to delight in the way of the Lord. May it be so for you and for me.

Prayer: Lord, I so desire to be the tree, rooted in your love and in your ways. Some days, though, I am more like a leaf, tossed about in the wind. On these days, Lord, draw me back in by the gentle whisper of your Holy Spirit. Guide me back home to you. Amen.


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Blessing… and Cursing

Reading: James 3: 7-12

Verse 8: “No one can tame the tongue. It is a restless evil, full of deadly poison.”

Photo credit: Klenova Tati

We begin today in James 3 with a great observation: mankind has been able to tame all kinds of wild creatures. Humanity has tamed and trained dolphins and whales, hawks and pigeons, dogs and lions, elephants and monkeys… And yet, “No one can tame the tongue. It is a restless evil, full of deadly poison.” Oh we might try, but we can’t quite seem to tame our wild tongues.

James points out the impact of this inability to tame our tongue. With the same lips we praise God and then we turn around and curse our fellow human beings. Since we are all made in the image of God, this is about the same thing as cursing God. When considered this way, it should cause us to pause before speaking, to consider our words a little more carefully. If we did this, we’d be less likely to gossip, to slander, to say that snarky comeback, to post that loaded comment. When we are quick to listen and slow to speak we are better able to see the image of God in the other person.

James returns to the natural world again to illustrate that we should not, even could not, bless and curse with the same lips. He reminds us that springs cannot produce both fresh and salty water and that fig trees can’t bear olives not can grapevines produce figs. In the same way we who are also made in the image of God should not be able to produce ungodly talk. And yet we do. And yet we do.

In verse ten we read, “My brothers [and sisters], this should not be so.” James is 100% correct. It is not easy to tame our tongue. It is, in fact, so easy to let it run wild. The tongue has the power to build up, to bring life, to offer comfort, to share hope, to bless with forgiveness, to guide others to Christ… This day and every day may these be the words we speak, loving and glorifying both God and our fellow human beings.

Prayer: Lord God, this is such a difficult challenge. Harsh and angry words are so much the norm in our world today. Yet you call us to be different, to stand out from the world, to be a light in the darkness. Help me today to tame my tongue. When words that are evil or hurtful begin to form in my heart, send the sure and full conviction of the Holy Spirit to nip those thoughts in the bud. And tomorrow and the next day and each day thereafter do the same. Thank you, Jesus. Amen.


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Blessing… and Cursing

Reading: James 3: 7-12

Verse 8: “No one can tame the tongue. It is a restless evil, full of deadly poison.”

Photo credit: Klenova Tati

We begin today in James 3 with a great observation: mankind has been able to tame all kinds of wild creatures. Humanity has tamed and trained dolphins and whales, hawks and pigeons, dogs and lions, elephants and monkeys… And yet, “No one can tame the tongue. It is a restless evil, full of deadly poison.” Oh we might try, but we can’t quite seem to tame our wild tongues.

James points out the impact of this inability to tame our tongue. With the same lips we praise God and then we turn around and curse our fellow human beings. Since we are all made in the image of God, this is about the same thing as cursing God. When considered this way, it should cause us to pause before speaking, to consider our words a little more carefully. If we did this, we’d be less likely to gossip, to slander, to say that snarky comeback, to post that loaded comment. When we are quick to listen and slow to speak we are better able to see the image of God in the other person.

James returns to the natural world again to illustrate that we should not, even could not, bless and curse with the same lips. He reminds us that springs cannot produce both fresh and salty water and that fig trees can’t bear olives not can grapevines produce figs. In the same way we who are also made in the image of God should not be able to produce ungodly talk. And yet we do. And yet we do.

In verse ten we read, “My brothers [and sisters], this should not be so.” James is 100% correct. It is not easy to tame our tongue. It is, in fact, so easy to let it run wild. The tongue has the power to build up, to bring life, to offer comfort, to share hope, to bless with forgiveness, to guide others to Christ… This day and every day may these be the words we speak, loving and glorifying both God and our fellow human beings.

Prayer: Lord God, this is such a difficult challenge. Harsh and angry words are so much the norm in our world today. Yet you call us to be different, to stand out from the world, to be a light in the darkness. Help me today to tame my tongue. When words that are evil or hurtful begin to form in my heart, send the sure and full conviction of the Holy Spirit to nip those thoughts in the bud. And tomorrow and the next day and each day thereafter do the same. Thank you, Jesus. Amen.


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Steadfast Forever

Reading: Psalm 111

Verse 7: “The works of God’s hands are faithful and just; all of God’s precepts are trustworthy”.

Psalm 111 begins with praise to God. The psalmist praises God for the great works and glorious and majestic deeds done for the people Israel. As followers of the Lord we too can praise God for the ways in which God has worked in our lives. The psalmist celebrates the manna in the desert and the victories over their enemies. For the Israelites, these are examples of God living into the covenants. As believers we can recall times when God has provided needed food or other resources at just the right time. We can remember those experiences when God has led us or even carried us through a time of trial. We too have come to know how faithful God is to those who love God.

Verse seven connects the ‘why’ we praise God with the ‘how to’ of knowing this God. Here we read, “The works of God’s hands are faithful and just; all of God’s precepts are trustworthy”. In the Israelite world there was a perceived connection between obedience to God and being blessed by God. As Christians we believe that God is trustworthy, steadfast, faithful, and upright. We believe that God provided redemption for us through his son Jesus Christ. We too live with fear (or reverence) of God and seek to be obedient to God’s will and ways. Yes, to God belongs eternal praise! But as Christians we do not see an illness or a difficult loss or diagnosis as evidence of our unfaithfulness. We do not connect conflict at work or at school as a sign of a lack of faith. Instead of these trials being evidence of sin or other failings in our faith, we recognize them as opportunities to draw closer to God, to rely more on God’s strength or peace or guidance or comfort or… Jesus promises to be with us always, to never leave or forsake us, assuring us that we will never be alone. God is steadfast forever. Thanks be to God!

Prayer: Loving and faithful God, in the good days and in the bad days, you have always been there. You are there in the ordinary and in the routine. Thank you for being with me in all things. You are an amazing and wonderful God! Amen.


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More Than Enough

Reading: 2nd Samuel 11:26 – 12:13a

Verse 8: “If all this had been too little, I would have given you even more”.

Photo credit: KMA

In our passage from 2nd Samuel we see God at work in David’s life. God sends Nathan the prophet to tell David a story. Although David has just committed some pretty horrendous sins, there is still a part of David that quickly recognizes injustice… I think we are all a bit like this. Outside of ourselves we quickly see when things are wrong.

Nathan tells David the story of a rich and powerful man who takes what he wants from a poor and insignificant man. David is outraged at the injustice. He rails against the actions of the rich man. He wants justice done. And then Nathan drops the bombshell: “You are the man”. Nathan goes on to remind David of how God has blessed and blessed and blessed David. At times we need this reminder too. When we get a bit of a woe-is-me attitude over some trivial thing, we too need to remember how blessed we are.

Verse eight is a wonderful reminder of God’s love for David and for you and me. It is also an invitation to contentment. This trait can be hard to live into in our culture that pontificates often about more, bigger, and better. Through Nathan God says to David and to us: “If all this had been too little, I would have given you even more”. God desires good and blessing for his children. God’s care and provision for us reveals his love for us. God might not give us the winning lottery ticket but God does want to fulfill the true desires of our heart. May we learn to trust into God. For with God, we have more than enough.

Prayer: Lord God, when I am tempted to see the greener grass or the shinier thing, remind me of my place in the center of your love. Remind me of the depth of your love for me. You are my all in all. Thank you, Lord. Amen.


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Praise and Worship

Reading: 2nd Samuel 6: 1-5 and 12b-19

Verse 5: “David and the whole house of Israel were celebrating with all their might before the Lord”.

Photo credit: Hannah Skelly

As chapter six opens, David begins to bring the Ark of God to Jerusalem. The Ark had first traveled with the Israelites through the desert during their wanderings and had always dwelt in the tabernacle. It represented God’s very presence with the people. A foolish decision was made to bring the Ark into battle. It was lost to the hated Philistines. But it brought disaster upon them and they sent it back. The Ark ended up at Abinadab’s house. His home was blessed by its presence. David decides that the Ark of God should be in the main city of Jerusalem.

A great crowd gathers to move and then welcome the Ark into the city of David. It is a joyous occasion, one worthy of great worship. We read in verse five that “David and the whole house of Israel were celebrating with all their might before the Lord”. The Ark was once again in the central place in Israel! The city would be blessed! What a great day!

David, the king, is leading the procession – both physically and spiritually. He is unashamed of his worship of the Lord. He “danced before the Lord with all his might”. He must have inspired others to worship wholeheartedly too. When has your worship moved others? When has your passion for the Lord drawn others deeper into the act of worship?

When they are in church, two little girls love to dance. The twins are going into first grade this fall. When they dance to the music it warms my heart and makes me smile all over. It connects me closer to God. Their joy raises my joy. It is something we can all do. May we too be willing to dance before the Lord with all our might.

Prayer: Lord of all, you alone are worthy of our praise and worship. Each day may I praise you and bring you the glory that is due. May my worship draw others deeper into relationship with you. Amen.


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After God’s Heart

Reading: 2nd Samuel 5: 1-5 and 9-10

Verse 2: “You will shepherd my people Israel, and you will become their ruler”.

Today’s passage begins with leaders from the tribes of Israel coming to David, asking him to be their king. David has already been made king over Judah and Simeon, the two southern regions of what was once a united nation. After Saul’s death David took up residence in Hebron, a major city in this region. A civil war had torn the nation apart. The ten northern tribes retained the name “Israel” and were under the control of Saul’s army and family. During the war David’s position grew stronger and Saul’s forces grew weaker and weaker. As the ugly civil war ends, representatives of the northern tribes come to David and ask for him to rule them too. They quote from the time when the prophet Samuel anointed a young shepherd boy, saying, “You will shepherd my people Israel, and you will become their ruler”.

God’s words come to fruition as David moves his capitol to Jerusalem and builds up the city and the fortifications. God continues to bless David as he grows “more and more powerful”. The one who anointed him and led him all these years continues to guide David.

David is one of my favorite Bible characters. While God was always with David, as he is with us, David was not perfect. The civil war and the establishment of Jerusalem as the capitol are filled with stories that turn the stomach. David’s affair with Bathsheba, the murder of her husband, and his poor parenting techniques reveal plenty of flaws in David. Yet just as grace and forgiveness are not about us, so too was the case with David. Grace and forgiveness come from God, a free gift to us. Over and over David experiences God’s grace and forgiveness not because he was perfect but because he had a repentant heart. David remained a man after God’s own heart. May it be so for us as well.

Prayer: Lord God, thank you for the example of David, one who was truly a man after your own heart. Even though he stumbled and failed at times, he always came back to you, the source of his hope and strength. When I stumble and fail, draw me back to you over and over. Thank you for your great love. Amen.


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Walking Humbly

Reading: Psalm 138

Verse 6: “Though the Lord is on high he looks upon the lowly, but the proud he knows from afar”.

Photo credit: Ben White

Returning to Psalm 138 today we are reminded that our relationship with God is built primarily upon God’s love and faithfulness. The Psalm opens with praise to God and expresses joy because God hears and answers prayer. Both of these things have led to growth in the psalmist’s faith. Prayer, praise, and thanksgiving are essential parts and building blocks of our faith as well.

Continuing today, we read these words in verse six: “Though the Lord is on high he looks upon the lowly, but the proud he knows from afar”. The psalmist recognizes that God is divine, almighty, above humanity. There is a humility, a lowliness, necessary to truly praise, worship, and thank God for the many ways that he blesses and elevates our lives. To follow David’s pattern, to take time daily to thank God for the ways that he touches our lives daily, specifically and intentionally, keeps us grounded in the reality that without God this would be a very different existence. This practice keeps us humble; it prevents us from thinking more of ourselves and our abilities than we should.

The proud do only know God from afar. Their achievements, whether athletic, financial, social… are their own doing. Time or need for God seems unnecessary. They are their own ‘gods’. How different from David’s words in our Psalm, how different from the example set by Jesus!

The Psalm draws near to a close with a request for God to “fulfill his purpose for me”. This is a prayer that looks beyond self. It is another recognition that we are created to glorify God, not ourselves. The Psalm closes with another reminder of God’s enduring love and with a request to remain connected to God and his plan for our lives. May this be our prayer today as we seek to walk humbly and faithfully with the Lord our God.

Prayer: Lord of all, yes you are on high but your Spirit walks daily with those who love you and look to you for meaning and purpose in this life. Please continue to guide and lead me each day, drawing me deeper and deeper into your love. Amen.


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Good and Pleasant Unity

Reading: Psalm 133

Verse 1: “How good and pleasant it is when brothers [and sisters] live together in unity”.

Psalm 133 speaks to and of the community of faith. David identifies unity as something that is “good and pleasant”. It is God’s desire that all his children live in unity and peace. In the Psalm David is writing to the nation of Israel but his words also speak to the whole community of faith and to the local church. Unity draws others in, enabling the body of Christ and the individual believer to grow and flourish.

David uses the yearly anointing of the high priest as his illustration of the blessings of unity. Once a year the specially formulated oil of blessing would be poured over the head of the high priest, symbolizing God’s blessings flowing down over the representative of God’s connection to the people. This act also expressed unity – unity between God and his people. The visual of the oil running down Aaron’s face and through his beard and down onto his robes is a reminder of the abundance of God’s blessings on the faithful.

The Psalm closes with “there the Lord bestows his blessing, even life forevermore”. “There” are the places of unity and harmony. In and through the community of faith is where we find “life forevermore”. So this day and every day may we each do our part to build up the unity of the body of Christ, experiencing God’s blessings and favor as we do so.

Prayer: Lord, it is so good and pleasant when we gather in worship and fellowship to praise your name and to serve one another. Build up our love for one another, raise up a humble servant’s heart in each of us. In all we do and say, together may we bring you the glory and honor. Amen.