pastorjohnb

Thoughts and musings on faith and our mighty God!


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Hold Fast

Reading: Jeremiah 8:18-9:1

Verse 19: “Listen to the cry of my people.”

Photo credit: Noah Silliman

In the opening verses of chapter 8 God details the many sins of the people and the punishment waiting on their doorstep. The weight of all this is reflected in the world that we read today. These words are heavy upon Jeremiah’s heart and soul. In the opening verse today we read, “My heart is faint within me.” He is overwhelmed with the suffering and the struggle, with the pain and sorrow soon to befall the people of God. It is as if the brokenness of the world has caught up with him. Jeremiah longs for comfort and strength from God.

We too live in a broken world. At times our hearts can grow faint. People continue to struggle with poverty, oppression, injustice, unfair systems… Many are filled with despair and their hearts are also heavy. Like Jeremiah, we can shout out, “Listen to the cry of my people.” The brokenness of his world leads Jeremiah to cry out to God, to seek to maintain his faith in God and in God’s goodness. When overwhelmed we can feel just as Jeremiah does in today’s text.

In verse 22 Jeremiah asks, “Why then is there no healing for the wound of my people?” He questions God not to doubt God but to show that he still believes that God is listening and that God’s heart is still bent towards the people. Even through his tears and grieving, Jeremiah trusts that God is faithful and just and loving and kind and compassionate. May we hold onto these truths, trusting in the Lord our God. Even in the struggle or trial, even in the brokenness, may we hold fast to the God who loves you and me.

Prayer: Lord God, when the world around me or when life itself begins to overwhelm, flood me with your love and truth. Raise up my heart and spirit, give me the faith and strength to offer your love to those in need, be it me or others. Amen.


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Called

Reading: Isaiah 1:1 and 10-20

Verses 16-17: “Stop doing wrong, learn to do right!”

Photo credit: Sophie Walker

Speaking through the prophet Isaiah, God calls out the people of Judah. In verse 10 God refers to the leaders of Judah as “rulers of Sodom” and to the people as “people of Gomorrah.” These were 2 evil-filled cities that God rained down fire and sulphur upon, destroying them completely. When God’s people thought of depravity and greed, these 2 cities would come to mind. To be compared to Sodom and Gomorrah – things must’ve been pretty bad in Judah.

In verse 11 we see that the people are still bringing sacrifices to the altar of God. But God is not pleased by them. These rote rituals are simply a “trampling of my courts.” This creates a vision of them rushing in, getting the deed done quickly, and rushing back out. God decries, “Stop bringing meaningless offerings!” Their hearts are far from God; their “hands are full of blood.”

God says to the children, “Stop doing wrong, learn to do right!” Stop sinning. Learn once again to do good in the world. We see God’s suggestions for doing good in verse 17: seek justice, encourage those who are oppressed, defend the orphans, stand with the widows. These words call out to us today as well. We live in a hurting and broken world. Our question is this: where is God calling us to do good?

Each of us has been called to be a part of the healing of the world. As followers of Christ we are charged with making disciples and with transforming the world. These two go hand in hand. As we seek to partner with God, working to bring about a more just and loving world, we are striving to build the kingdom of God here “on earth as it is in heaven.” May these words not just be a rote ritual that we say each Sunday morning.

Where is God calling you? Where can you be a part of healing this hurting and broken world? Through the power of the Holy Spirit may God use each of us today, according to God’s will.

Prayer: Lord God, where does the world’s brokenness meet my passions? Where does the hurting meet my hope? Where do you need me today? O God, lead me to serve you and your children. Use me as you will today. Amen.


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Righteousness Will Go Before Us

Reading: Psalm 85:8-13

Verse 11: “Faithfulness springs forth from the earth, and righteousness looks down from heaven.”

As we continue today in Psalm 85 we also continue to look at reconciliation. In verse 8 the process begins with listening to God while not returning to sinful living. This would indicate really hearing and taking to heart God’s vision for our lives and for our world. There is a two-fold benefit to these practices. First, salvation comes “near those who fear the Lord.” Second, God’s glory is revealed to the world.

Reconciliation requires that both parties are equally involved. In verse 10 we see that God brings love and righteousness while the people bring faithfulness and peace – peace with God and with one another. Both parties role is echoed in verse 11: “Faithfulness springs forth from the earth, and righteousness looks down from heaven.” Reconciliation is a process. As I wrote about yesterday, time and effort are required. One does not go from unfaithful to totally faithful in an instant. This process requires growth and transformation.

Our hearts and minds should be drawn to our world when we think of reconciliation. Without much effort one can see the brokenness of many of our systems. Whether urban or reservation, whether jailed or caught in addiction or human trafficking, there are many people trapped in these systems. To offer true reconciliation between people and to create new systems that offer growth and transformation, we must see the past as our teacher and our faith as our way forward. Doing so our world could begin to live into the promises of verse 12. God is good and desires good for the world. God is righteous. God’s righteousness will go before us, preparing the way and guiding our steps. May it be so.

Prayer: Lord God, open my eyes and my heart to the brokenness in my community. Reveal to me the places to go to bring your healing to our world. Use me as part of your plan to reconcile and restore our land. Amen.


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Rebuild and Restore

Reading: Psalm 85:1-7

Verse 4: “Restore us again, O God our Savior, and put away your displeasure towards us.”

Psalm 85 is written after the punishment and exile that Hosea foretold. God has allowed the people to begin returning and rebuilding what had been destroyed, both physically and relationally. Leaving Babylon, God “showed favor” and “restored the fortunes of Jacob.” God forgave their sins and “turned away from your fierce anger.” Things have gotten better, but…

Have you ever had a really big fight with your spouse or with a good friend? After some time apart, you begin to talk again. Yet all is not fixed, right? Reconciliation and restoration is the goal but you’re not quite there yet. Words must be spoken, behaviors demonstrated in order to begin to repair what was wounded or broken. Often trust must be rebuilt. This is where God and Israel are in their relationship.

In verses 4-6 the psalmist expresses a longing to get back into right relationship with God. There is an implication that Israel feels ready. Lessons have been learned. Humility and reverence are again present. It is usually the party that is at fault who first longs to re-enter relationship and to put the ugliness behind them. In verse 7 the writer asks God to “Show us your unfailing love, O Lord, and grant us your salvation.” Israel longs to be made whole again.

We’ve all been there. We’ve all sinned and created separation between God and ourselves. Today’s text is a good reminder of how we can reapproach God as we seek to rebuild and restore our relationship with God.

Prayer: Lord God, I long to live in a full and complete relationship with you. So often, though, I get in the way. My pride, my selfishness, my desires create a distance between us. Help the me inside to become less and less so that you can become more and more. Amen.


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Rise Up, O God

Reading: Psalm 82

Verse 8: “Rise up, O God, judge the earth.”

Psalm 82 calls God’s attention to the wicked and to those practicing oppression. The writer of the Psalm, Asaph, calls for God to “rise up” and to “judge the earth.” As he looks at the state of affairs in the world, Asaph’s heart is broken for the “cause of the weak and fatherless” and for the “rights of the poor and oppressed.” He calls on God to rescue and deliver these from the “hand of the wicked.” These concerns that touch Asaph’s heart also touch God’s heart. So Asaph asks God, “How long?”

Asaph wants God to judge those who “walk about in darkness” as they practice evil and live self-centered lives. If honest, I must admit that there are times when I see or encounter people being greedy or selfish or mean and I hope that God intervenes and gives them their due. I too think or ask, “How long?”

As I write these words I look forward to today and to upcoming event that are planned, I’d love to live many more years on this earth. For Asaph there was a reality that when he asked God to “rise up” and bring judgment that he too would be included in that time of judgment. The same is true for me. And for you. Although far from perfect, I am covered by the blood of Jesus and hope to one day attain my eternal inheritance. Day by day I seek to resist the pull to be greedy and selfish. Day by day I seek to bring light and love into the darkness and pain of this world. A great day of judgment is coming. May we be found worthy of standing in the great cloud of witness.

Prayer: Lord God, lead me day by day so that all I do and say and think may be pleasing in your sight. Turn me from evil when temptation arises. Guard my heart against pride and selfishness. Thank you, Lord. Amen.


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Go in Power

Reading: Luke 24:44-53

Verse 47: “Repentance and forgiveness of sins will be preached in my name to all nations, beginning at Jerusalem.”

At the beginning of his ministry Jesus spent 40 days in the wilderness preparing himself to be in ministry. At the end of his time on earth, Jesus spends 40 days preparing his followers to carry on his ministry. On this last day, Jesus summarizes and reinforces his time with them, together in ministry. Jesus “opened their minds so they could understand the scriptures.” It is the next to last step.

Jesus begins their commission in verse 47. Here he says, “Repentance and forgiveness of sins will be preached in my name to all nations, beginning at Jerusalem.” The disciples will begin in Jerusalem and then will spread out into the world, preaching the good news of Jesus Christ. He reminds them, “You are witnesses.” They have seen lives changed; they have been present when hearts have been made new. They know firsthand the power of Christ to transform lives. And, in verse 49, Jesus promises the gift of the Holy Spirit. We will celebrate the giving of this gift soon, as the Holy Spirit comes at Pentecost, clothing the disciples with Jesus’ power. Filled with the power and presence of the Holy Spirit, the disciples will proclaim Jesus to the world.

Today, on Ascension Day, may we too accept the commission anew, committing ourselves to the sharing of the good news. Jesus continues to transform lives and to bring healing to our broken world. Like the disciples, we too need the power and presence of the Holy Spirit. May we pause at times, allowing the Spirit to fill us, to lead and guide us, to help us discern the path, and to go before us. Filled in these ways, may we then go forth in power, witnessing to the good news of Jesus Christ.

Prayer: Lord God, flood my heart and mind with the power and presence of the Holy Spirit. Open me up to you, filling me with your words and your love. Speak to my heart and mind today, Lord, and use me to spread the good news of Jesus Christ with a world in need. Amen.


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Day by Day

Reading: Revelation 22:1:5

Verses 3 and 5: “No longer will there be any curse… the Lord God will give them light.”

Photo credit: Uta Scholl

As we turn again to Revelation 22 today, we read of a place we long for. The world will no longer be in bondage to sin and death: their “curses” will be no more. The “tree of life” will bring healing to the nations and people. All of humanity – people from all tribes, languages, races… – will gather and worship the Lord. Time as we know it will be no more: “the Lord God will give them light.” All will be lit by the light of the Lord. There will be no more darkness.

This picture of heaven, in all it’s beauty and grandeur, is a wonderful image to hold in our mind and heart. It is a place and time to look forward to, to find hope and peace in. But it is not just a future idea or image. It is also what Jesus spoke of when he talked about heaven drawing near and when we talk of building the kingdom here on earth.

Day by day, as followers of the Lord God, we seek to be light in the darkness and we seek to bring healing to this earth. We strive to restore relationships and to love all people – not just one another in the family of God. Sometimes we even fail at these two things. We too are part of the broken world, part of the “curse” at times. When we are, we pause and confess and repent, and we turn back towards the Lord’s light. We find healing for ourselves and then begin to walk anew, guided once again by holy light and pure love. Day by day may we draw closer to the Lord and to the realization of heaven here on earth.

Prayer: Lord God, help me to be a person of light. Use me to build up the presence of your kingdom here on earth. Let your light shine in and through me today and every day. Amen.


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Praise, Honor, Glory, and Power

Reading: Revelation 5:11-14

Verse 13: “Then I heard every creature in heaven and on earth and under earth and on the sea, and all that is in them singing.”

In our passage from Revelation 5 we get a snippet of what it will be like in heaven. In John’s vision there is a huge group of angels encircling the living creatures and elders, singing to the Lamb of God, Jesus Christ. They elate the “one who was slain” as the one worthy to receive “power, wealth, wisdom, strength, honor, glory, and power.” This scene is quite the glorious assembly of worship!

Then, in verse 13, we see that the congregation grows even larger. Here we read, “Then I heard every creature in heaven and on earth and under earth and on the sea, and all that is in them singing.” The heavenly host is joined by all of creation. Those people and creatures living on the earth, in the earth, on the sea, and in the sea join their voices to praise the Lamb on the throne. They offer Jesus Christ “praise and honor and glory and power forever and ever.” What an incredible scene of worship!

Sometimes I wonder if Jesus has not returned yet because there are lots of people to save and many parts of creation that are broken. Is our patient and loving God waiting until more of creation has come to know Jesus Christ as Lord and Savior, as redeemer and restorer? When I compare our world today to this vision in Revelation 5, I see a lot of people that would not praise the Lord. I also see a lot of creation that is broken – would this too struggle to lift voice in praise?

These thoughts call me to consider my role, my impact. They lead me to ask: Who can I share Jesus with today? And, how am I living on behalf of creation? These thoughts and questions call me to a way of living and being that invites others into the kingdom of God and that honors all that the Lord has made. Join me today in considering how we can live and be in ways that bring God the praise, honor, glory, and power.

Prayer: Lord God, use me today to share the good news of Jesus Christ. In all that I say and do today, may I first consider how it builds the kingdom and honors your creation. Amen.


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This Ruler

Reading: Micah 5: 2-5a

Verses 4-5: “He will stand and shepherd his flock… And he will be their peace.”

Photo credit: Hans Heiner Buhr

Micah writes in chapter five of the promised ruler that will come from Bethlehem. Even though “small among the clans,” one who will rule over Israel will be born here. This will be no ordinary king. No, this ruler will be one “whose origins are from old, from days of eternity.” This ruler will be one who was present before time began and who will reign forever.

Micah also describes this ruler’s reign: “He will stand and shepherd his flock.” This king will be like a shepherd, like one who tends the flock. This will not be a ruler who reigns from the throne in the palace. This ruler will be right there with the people – spending cold nights out in the fields, seeking shelter under trees and in caves when the rains come. This ruler will do anything to protect, to lead, to guide the flock. This ruler will know what it is like to be one of the flock, so personal and intimate will their connection be.

Because of this ruler’s great love, the flock will be secure. This ruler’s greatness will “reach the ends of the earth.” There are parts of the kingdom present all around the world. In every nation are followers who bow at the mention of his great name. In the last verse we read, “And he will be their peace.” No, this ruler does not shield the flock from all of the dangers and difficulties of the world. This ruler does not lock the flock up behind impregnable walls, insulating them from the world. Just the opposite: this ruler sends the flock out into the world to engage it, to interact with it, to live among the pain, the brokenness, the hurting – just as he did when he walked the earth. It is sometimes scary or dangerous or uncomfortable. But this ruler sends the flock our covered in his peace.

The Good Shepherd continues to send us, the flock, out into the world, bringing his peace and great love with us. As we go forth today may we seek to bring the peace and love of Christ to all we meet, connecting them to the one born in a manger in little Bethlehem. May it be so for us all.

Prayer: Lord God, under your gentle guidance and strong protection, lead me out today. Help me to see all people as potential members of the flock. Use my words and actions to draw others inside the circle of your love and peace. Amen.


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Healing and Wholeness

Reading: 2nd Samuel 6: 14-19

Verse 16: “When she saw King David leaping and dancing before the Lord, she despised him in her heart”.

Photo credit: Noah Silliman

The Ark enters Jerusalem to a great and joyous celebration. There are sacrifices and singing and dancing and music and rejoicing. In verse fifteen we read, “the entire house of Israel” was present to celebrate this event. It seems that everyone is enjoying this time of celebration.

Some nights at youth group we are playing a game or singing worship songs and a kid is off by themselves, either physically or emotionally. They do not want to participate. More often than not they have been hurt by something someone did or said and rightly so. Some of the time it is because of something that happened at school or at home. The same thing can happen with us as adults. We wall up when we are hurting. We’re just better at hiding it. People are hurting all around us.

As the Ark proceeded we read of Michal watching from a window. She is not down in the street with the crowd. As she watches David we read, “When she saw King David leaping and dancing before the Lord, she despised him in her heart”. To see her husband, the king, celebrating when she was grieving, it hardened her heart. She had just lost her father and three brothers.

At youth group that young person looks at us playing or worshipping and wonders how we could do that when they’re hurting. In church the one who has lost a job or a loved one or… wonders how we can be joyous when they are in such pain. There are hurting people all around.

Our task is to notice – to connect with that kid at youth group or that person in church or that stranger on the bench. We are to have eyes that see and hearts that feel – gifts that allow and help us to draw others into the circle of God’s love. Doing so, may God’s love and our love bring healing and wholeness to our broken and hurting world.

Prayer: Lord God, grant that I may see and sense those who need to know your love today. May your love flow in and through me. Amen.