pastorjohnb

Thoughts and musings on faith and our mighty God!


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Just a Few Words

Reading: James 3: 1-6

Verse 6: “The tongue is also a fire, a world of evil among the parts of the body.”

Photo credit: Devin Avery

Turning to James 3 today we begin the section called “Taming the Tongue” in my Bible. Using great metaphors, James illustrates the power of our words. Today’s passage uses some strong words to communicate the importance of what we allow or do not allow to come from our mouths.

James begins by speaking to the leaders and potential leaders in the churches. He warns that those in leadership “will be judged more strictly.” Is James referring to judgment by God or by men? I believe that James is thinking of both in this passage. Those with a platform from which to speak really need to be aware of the impact of their words. Going on James points out “we all stumble in many ways.” Yes, we are all far from perfect.

Using the metaphors of a small bit controlling a large animal like a horse and the tiny rudder that steers a large ship driven by strong winds, James helps us to understand that the small tongue in our mouths can have huge impacts when we make even small boasts. He parallels this to a small spark that sets a whole forest on fire. In verse six James writes, “The tongue is also a fire, a world of evil among the parts of the body.” The tongue does have potential to do much harm. All of us can quickly think of times when we have been hurt or stung by another’s words. We can just as readily recall many instances when our words have done the same to others. The tongue can certainly be “a world of evil.” We all need to exercise great care with our words.

James closes this part of our passage for this week with the recognition that our tongue can “corrupt the whole person”. Just a few words can affect how we see another person or can impact how we are seen and understood. The damage quickly done can be very hard to undo. With all of this in mind, may we harken back to the call to be quick to listen and slow to speak, seeking to better tame our tongue. May it be so for you and for me.

Prayer: Lord God, give me a patient tongue. In those moments when I am tempted to speak quick or harsh words, slow me down. Guard the thoughts of my heart and shield me from the temptations of the evil one. May the Holy Spirit be my filter each day. Amen.


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Just a Few Words

Reading: James 3: 1-6

Verse 6: “The tongue is also a fire, a world of evil among the parts of the body.”

Photo credit: Devin Avery

Turning to James 3 today we begin the section called “Taming the Tongue” in my Bible. Using great metaphors, James illustrates the power of our words. Today’s passage uses some strong words to communicate the importance of what we allow or do not allow to come from our mouths.

James begins by speaking to the leaders and potential leaders in the churches. He warns that those in leadership “will be judged more strictly.” Is James referring to judgment by God or by men? I believe that James is thinking of both in this passage. Those with a platform from which to speak really need to be aware of the impact of their words. Going on James points out “we all stumble in many ways.” Yes, we are all far from perfect.

Using the metaphors of a small bit controlling a large animal like a horse and the tiny rudder that steers a large ship driven by strong winds, James helps us to understand that the small tongue in our mouths can have huge impacts when we make even small boasts. He parallels this to a small spark that sets a whole forest on fire. In verse six James writes, “The tongue is also a fire, a world of evil among the parts of the body.” The tongue does have potential to do much harm. All of us can quickly think of times when we have been hurt or stung by another’s words. We can just as readily recall many instances when our words have done the same to others. The tongue can certainly be “a world of evil.” We all need to exercise great care with our words.

James closes this part of our passage for this week with the recognition that our tongue can “corrupt the whole person”. Just a few words can affect how we see another person or can impact how we are seen and understood. The damage quickly done can be very hard to undo. With all of this in mind, may we harken back to the call to be quick to listen and slow to speak, seeking to better tame our tongue. May it be so for you and for me.

Prayer: Lord God, give me a patient tongue. In those moments when I am tempted to speak quick or harsh words, slow me down. Guard the thoughts of my heart and shield me from the temptations of the evil one. May the Holy Spirit be my filter each day. Amen.


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Just a Few Words

Reading: James 3: 1-6

Verse 6: “The tongue is also a fire, a world of evil among the parts of the body.”

Photo credit: Devin Avery

Turning to James 3 today we begin the section called “Taming the Tongue” in my Bible. Using great metaphors, James illustrates the power of our words. Today’s passage uses some strong words to communicate the importance of what we allow or do not allow to come from our mouths.

James begins by speaking to the leaders and potential leaders in the churches. He warns that those in leadership “will be judged more strictly.” Is James referring to judgment by God or by men? I believe that James is thinking of both in this passage. Those with a platform from which to speak really need to be aware of the impact of their words. Going on James points out “we all stumble in many ways.” Yes, we are all far from perfect.

Using the metaphors of a small bit controlling a large animal like a horse and the tiny rudder that steers a large ship driven by strong winds, James helps us to understand that the small tongue in our mouths can have huge impacts when we make even small boasts. He parallels this to a small spark that sets a whole forest on fire. In verse six James writes, “The tongue is also a fire, a world of evil among the parts of the body.” The tongue does have potential to do much harm. All of us can quickly think of times when we have been hurt or stung by another’s words. We can just as readily recall many instances when our words have done the same to others. The tongue can certainly be “a world of evil.” We all need to exercise great care with our words.

James closes this part of our passage for this week with the recognition that our tongue can “corrupt the whole person”. Just a few words can affect how we see another person or can impact how we are seen and understood. The damage quickly done can be very hard to undo. With all of this in mind, may we harken back to the call to be quick to listen and slow to speak, seeking to better tame our tongue. May it be so for you and for me.

Prayer: Lord God, give me a patient tongue. In those moments when I am tempted to speak quick or harsh words, slow me down. Guard the thoughts of my heart and shield me from the temptations of the evil one. May the Holy Spirit be my filter each day. Amen.


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Wondrous

Reading: Ephesians 1: 1-10

Verse 4: “For he chose us in him before the creation of the world to be holy and blameless in his sight”.

Today we begin a journey through Ephesians. I love the opening line: “To the saints in Ephasus, the faithful in Christ Jesus”. It is such a hopeful line! If someone began a letter to you or me with that line we’d be pretty happy, wouldn’t we? Well, Paul goes on to explain that God does choose all of humanity to be recipients of his love, mercy, grace… While this specific letter is written to the churches in and around Ephasus, the themes and truths apply to Christians everywhere.

In verse four we read, “For he chose us in him before the creation of the world to be holy and blameless in his sight”. Not only does God bless those who hope in Christ, he has chosen us to be like him. Being created in God’s image we were made to be holy and blameless. Living in a fallen and broken world, we often fail to live up to this image. Paul addresses this too. Knowing the limitations of humanity, in love God planned for the coming of Jesus, the one who offers us “redemption through his blood, the forgiveness of sins”. God knew we would stumble and fall. So God lavished upon us his grace found in Jesus Christ. In his deep and abundant love God made a way for us fallen and imperfect beings to live in relationship with him and with one another. What wondrous love is this. May we share this love with all the world.

Prayer: Lord God, you chose me. You created me to be in relationship with you. You are holy and blameless. I am far from these things. Yet you love me and call me back into relationship over and over. What love. Thanks be to you, most wondrous God. Amen.


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Stumbling Unbelief

Reading: Mark 6: 1-6

Verse 6: “He was amazed at their unbelief”.

As we begin with Mark 6 today Jesus returns home to Nazareth. Jesus had lived there for most of thirty years. He was a local kid that almost everyone knew. Most of his family still lived there. On the Sabbath Jesus goes to the local synagogue and begins to teach. As the people take in what Jesus is teaching about, they are “astounded”. His teaching is good; they are impressed.

But then they begin to question, to ask how Jesus acquired such knowledge, such power. They ask, “Is this not the carpenter”? Isn’t this just the kid who grew up down the street? Isn’t that the one who our daughter babysat back in the day? In the original Greek, the word Mark used to describe what was going on here was “skandalizo”. You might recognize the root word here. In the Greek it meant to ‘stumble’. Jesus had and would continue to cause many to stumble, to turn away, to leave the faith that they had found in him.

To his credit, Jesus recognizes what is going on here. He does not get angry or resentful. He understands it for what it is as he identifies the cause of their unbelief. He says, “Prophets are not without honor except in their hometown”. Because of this Jesus’ power is limited. He is unable to do any “deeds of power” except a few small healings. We too can dismiss Jesus’ power at times. We can withhold our needs from him. We can think Jesus unable or unwilling to respond to our prayers and petitions. When unbelief and doubt rises in our hearts, we too rend power from Jesus. In our passage today, we see that Jesus was “amazed at their unbelief”. When we are tempted to limit Jesus, may we hear the warning in today’s passage, lest we stumble too.

Prayer: Lord God, when doubt creeps in, when the world begins to speak into my spirit, call me back with your gentle whisper. Draw me back into close relationship with my Savior and Lord. Amen.


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Forever and Ever

Reading: Psalm 111

Verse 9: “He provided redemption for his people; he ordained his covenant forever”.

Photo credit: Oscar Ivan Esquivel Artega

In the second half of Psalm 111 the focus shifts from the great works of God to the everlasting nature of God’s love. In verse seven the psalmist declares that God’s precepts or ways are trustworthy and are steadfast “for ever and ever”. Then in verse nine the writer speaks of the redemption that God provided as “he ordained his covenant forever”. Forever is always the nature of God’s covenants. They are not like a contract – that which we prefer. Contracts can be broken, renegotiated, bought out… when we no longer want to live under that arrangement. Not so with a covenant. God’s covenant states that he will be our God, our love, our hope forever. No matter what.

Marriage would be the closest thing we have to a covenant relationship. As one takes their marriage vows, one gets a sense of the forever, no matter what, unconditional love that God offers and gives in his covenant with us. As one says, “for richer or poorer, in sickness and in health…” they are really saying “forever” in terms of this earthly relationship. Marriage is an earthly relationship that models our eternal relationship with God. In fact, husband-wife and groom-bride language describes the relationship between Jesus and church, between follower and redeemer. Jesus chose this language intentionally. It both elevated our human marriages and it placed our covenant relationship with God in terms that we could grasp and understand.

Humans prefer contracts over covenants. They better suit our selfish hearts and our changing wants and desires. God prefers covenants. God is unchanging, steadfast, and true. God has chosen us forever. God created us for that purpose. Even though I may waver, even though I may stumble, even though I may fail, God remains eternally our God. Thanks be to God.

Prayer: Loving God, I am so grateful for your “no matter what” love – for the love that is always there for me. Thank you for redeeming me again and again, working in me to shape me and to transform me more and more into your image. Amen.


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Go

Reading: 1 Kings 19: 9b-15

Verse 9b: “What are you doing here”?

Earlier this week I looked at verses 1 through 9a in this same chapter. To review quickly, Elijah angered the queen, fled in fear, and was cared for and guided by God to the cave on Mount Horeb. In the morning, God asks Elijah, “What are you doing here”? This is a question that I think God asks often.

Fear and worry and doubt and job fatigue led Elijah to flee – to hide from the world. I can relate to some of these emotions and to Elijah’s response to them. Once in a great while monastic life seems like a great idea. His loving God leads Elijah to a safe place, to a cave atop a mountain, far away from his enemies and from the world. Until God asks this question, the cave is a comfortable place for Elijah.

When I retreat it is not usually to a cave or to any other physical place. When I do retreat it is usually into myself. In those moments when the world seems against me or when it seems to be closing in, I withdraw emotionally. In my mind I disconnect. I try and create felt distance and separation. But soon enough, God asks, “What are you doing here”?

Elijah has a response. He has been thinking about it. He knows the question is coming. This process is familiar to me too. Elijah tells God that he has been “very zealous for the Lord God Almighty” – I’ve been working really hard for you God. And these people – these Israelites – they have broken the covenant. Why would I want to be with those sinners? And then the ice cream atop the cake – “I am the only one left”. Woe is me. Have you been here? I certainly have.

The God says, in essence, ‘Come here. Come here Elijah’. Elijah goes to the entrance to the cave and the noise of the world passes by. The wind, the earthquake, the fire – those are the threats of Jezebel, the fears of the world, the self-pity. Then Elijah hears a gentle whisper. Ah, God has arrived. It is significant that God comes in the calm, in the quiet.

But once again Elijah tries the “I’ve been so busy…” excuses. God simply says, “Go…”. Return to the world, go where I am sending you. I will be with you. God knows we will stumble and falter too. God says the same thing to us: go, go where I lead. I will be with you. God continues to lead Elijah every step of the way. God will do the same for us. So, go.

Prayer: God, in those moments when I too doubt or fear or feel wrung out, come and push me back out into the world. Use me for what you will. Strengthen and encourage and fill me for the task at hand. Help me to ever step forth in faith. Amen.


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God My Savior

Reading: Psalm 25: 1-7

Verse 5: “Guide me in your truth and teach me, for you are God my Savior, and my hope is in you all day long”.

Today’s Psalm reminds us that we live in relationship with God. For our part, we trust God, we place our hope in God, we seek God’s love and forgiveness. For God’s part, God protects us, God teaches us, God guides us, God forgives us, and God loves us. One quickly notices that God does more than we do!

How we live in relationship with God reflects this as well. The psalmist writes “I lift my soul” and “in you I trust” and “show me” – indicating a reliance on or need for God. There is also a call for protection from enemies.

In verses 4 and 5 we find the heart of the relationship. These verses express our deep need for God’s instruction. They begin by asking God to show us how to love like God, to treat others as God does, to do as God does. They seek to know God’s paths – the roads to those in need, to those who are lonely, to those who are hurting or broken. Verse 5 sums it up well, asking God to “guide me in your truth and teach me, for you are God my Savior, and my hope is in you all day long”. All day long.

The psalmist recognizes God as his Savior. This becomes the focus of verses 6 and 7. The psalmist calls upon God to remember God’s “great love and mercy”. It is with and because of these that the psalmist asks God to “remember not” the sins and rebellious ways that he has practiced. These are also our cries to God. In our struggles with sin, we too beg God to “remember not”. This section closes by asking God to remember us in love, drawn from God’s goodness. This too is a good request for us to make: think of us in love today, O God, poured out from your goodness. Remember not our sins but love us in your great mercy. Thank you God.

Prayer: Lord, I join the psalmist today, asking you to lead and guide me, to show me your ways. May all I do and say honor you and bring you glory. And when I stumble, when I fail, please pour out your mercy and grace and love upon me. Thank you God my Savior. Amen.


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Tongue, Mind, and Heart

Reading: James 3: 1-8

Verse 8: “No man can tame the tongue. It is a restless evil, full of deadly poison”.

Taming the tongue is never easy. James is absolutely correct when he writes, “We all stumble in many ways”. Our words are usually what affects others the most, so being in control of our tongue is essential to living a faithful, Christian life.

The tongue is quite small compared to the rest of our body. Like a bit in a horse’s mouth or a rudder on a ship, the small tongue can choose our path or set our course. And like a small spark, our tongue can create a raging fire. James extends the fire idea to our final destination point if we allow our tongues to control us: hell.

The reality is, though, that the tongue cannot speak on its own. The tongue only forms the words brought to it by our minds. So to really control our tongues, we begin with what we put in our minds. When our mind is filled with the evils of the world, then that is what comes out of our mouths. When we fill our minds with the things of God, this is what our tongues speak. If we meditate on God’s Word and know His ways, then our tongues will be filled with faith.

Closely related to what is in our minds is what is in our heart. The same pattern is true here. If we allow anger and bitterness and envy and jealousy to dwell in our hearts, then our mind quickly turns to these things as well. But if instead we fill our hearts with love and mercy and Grace and forgiveness, then these God qualities will be what our mind turns to.

In James 3:8 he writes, “No man can tame the tongue. It is a restless evil, full of deadly poison”. While it may certainly be true that one cannot ever fully tame the tongue, one can definitely do things that make this task easier. When we fill our hearts and minds with the things of God there is less room for the things of this world. May it be so each and every day.

God, fill me with your Words and with your Holy Spirit. Fill me with you so there is less room for me. Then, may my words and thoughts be pleasing to you, O Lord. May I honor you today. Amen.


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Tongue, Mind, and Heart

Reading: James 3: 1-8

Verse 8: “No man can tame the tongue. It is a restless evil, full of deadly poison”.

Taming the tongue is never easy. James is absolutely correct when he writes, “We all stumble in many ways”. Our words are usually what affects others the most, so being in control of our tongue is essential to living a faithful, Christian life.

The tongue is quite small compared to the rest of our body. Like a bit in a horse’s mouth or a rudder on a ship, the small tongue can choose our path or set our course. And like a small spark, our tongue can create a raging fire. James extends the fire idea to our final destination point if we allow our tongues to control us: hell.

The reality is, though, that the tongue cannot speak on its own. The tongue only forms the words brought to it by our minds. So to really control our tongues, we begin with what we put in our minds. When our mind is filled with the evils of the world, then that is what comes out of our mouths. When we fill our minds with the things of God, this is what our tongues speak. If we meditate on God’s Word and know His ways, then our tongues will be filled with faith.

Closely related to what is in our minds is what is in our heart. The same pattern is true here. If we allow anger and bitterness and envy and jealousy to dwell in our hearts, then our mind quickly turns to these things as well. But if instead we fill our hearts with love and mercy and Grace and forgiveness, then these God qualities will be what our mind turns to.

In James 3:8 he writes, “No man can tame the tongue. It is a restless evil, full of deadly poison”. While it may certainly be true that one cannot ever fully tame the tongue, one can definitely do things that make this task easier. When we fill our hearts and minds with the things of God there is less room for the things of this world. May it be so each and every day.

God, fill me with your Words and with your Holy Spirit. Fill me with you so there is less room for me. Then, may my words and thoughts be pleasing to you, O Lord. May I honor you today. Amen.