pastorjohnb

Thoughts and musings on faith and our mighty God!


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Closer and Closer

Reading: Revelation 22:12-14, 16-17, and 20-21

Verse 14: “Blessed are those who was their robes, that they may have the right to the tree of life.”

Our passage from the end of the book of Revelation is one of hope and promise. But it also begins with a reality that we cannot gloss past. In verse 12 Jesus speaks of a reward. It is a reward that will (or won’t) be given “according to what he [or she] has done.” This life that we live matters. The life we live on earth will determine our eternity. In order to spend eternity with Jesus, we need to walk daily in this life with Jesus.

In verse 14 we read, “Blessed are those who was their robes.” All of this life will be washed away and we will be made into new creations – holy and perfect in Christ’s sight. This was and is made possible by the death and resurrection of our Lord and Savior. The mercy, grace, and forgiveness we receive came at a cost to Jesus and to God. While the gift is free to you and me, it did not come without cost.

Once cleansed we “have the right to the tree of life.” The tree of life bears fruit in every season and it’s leaves offer healing. Just as our sins and blemishes will be washed away, our hurts and pains and griefs will be healed. There will be no more tears or sadness or anger or greed or jealousy. Washed and healed, we will fully drink of the “water of life” and we will dwell in the light and love of the “bright morning star” – Jesus Christ.

This vision of a one day reality is beautiful and awesome. It is a time we long for. Jesus says, “Come! Whoever is thirsty, let him [or her] come.” Jesus invites us towards the new heaven and earth. May we seek to walk daily in Christ’s light and love, encouraging others on their journey, moving closer and closer to Christ and eternity in glory.

Prayer: Lord God, what a day it will be. How wide will be the smiles on the faces of those who stand before you in glory, fully realizing your love. Guide me day by day to walk deeply in that love. Use me to help others to know that love. Amen.


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Day by Day

Reading: Revelation 22:1:5

Verses 3 and 5: “No longer will there be any curse… the Lord God will give them light.”

Photo credit: Uta Scholl

As we turn again to Revelation 22 today, we read of a place we long for. The world will no longer be in bondage to sin and death: their “curses” will be no more. The “tree of life” will bring healing to the nations and people. All of humanity – people from all tribes, languages, races… – will gather and worship the Lord. Time as we know it will be no more: “the Lord God will give them light.” All will be lit by the light of the Lord. There will be no more darkness.

This picture of heaven, in all it’s beauty and grandeur, is a wonderful image to hold in our mind and heart. It is a place and time to look forward to, to find hope and peace in. But it is not just a future idea or image. It is also what Jesus spoke of when he talked about heaven drawing near and when we talk of building the kingdom here on earth.

Day by day, as followers of the Lord God, we seek to be light in the darkness and we seek to bring healing to this earth. We strive to restore relationships and to love all people – not just one another in the family of God. Sometimes we even fail at these two things. We too are part of the broken world, part of the “curse” at times. When we are, we pause and confess and repent, and we turn back towards the Lord’s light. We find healing for ourselves and then begin to walk anew, guided once again by holy light and pure love. Day by day may we draw closer to the Lord and to the realization of heaven here on earth.

Prayer: Lord God, help me to be a person of light. Use me to build up the presence of your kingdom here on earth. Let your light shine in and through me today and every day. Amen.


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Share and Build

Reading: Revelation 21:1, John 13:31, and Acts 11:1

Rev. 21:1 – “Then I saw a new heaven and a new earth, for the first heaven and the first earth had passed away, and there was no longer any sea.”

There will be a day when this world is no more. On that day the new heaven and earth will be established and God will once again walk with humankind. Our Revelation text also tells us that the sea will be no more. At the beginning of time the sea represented chaos and disorder. It was a great unknown still in Jesus’ day. 1,500+ years later we still believed that if you went too far you came to the end and you dropped off into a forever of nothingness. Symbolically, in Revelation, no sea means an end to the chaos and disorder of this world and this life. Therefore, no more death, tears, crying, pain…

In our verse from Acts 11 we are reminded that the Gentiles received God’s word. ‘Gentile’ was a term that originally referred to all people who were outside of the Jewish faith. In time it came to represent all people living without a relationship with Jesus Christ. The idea that all people can receive the word of God was a grand opening of the faith. Anyone and everyone became potential disciples.

John 13:31 speaks of Jesus and God being glorified. This refers to Jesus being raised from the dead. Taken in the context of our Revelation and Acts verses, it reminds us that when we share the good news of Jesus Christ and lead others towards a relationship with Christ, then Jesus and God are glorified here too. Each step, each effort to include all people in the family of God, each inches us closer to the day of a new heaven and earth while also bringing more of that kingdom to this earth. May we seek to share and build the kingdom of God today and every day by glorifying Christ!

Prayer: Lord God, the day of a new heaven and earth will be glorious beyond imagination. It will be awesome! Use me today and every day to make this earth a little more like the one to come. Amen.


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Heavenly Worship

Reading: Revelation 7:9-12

Verse 9: “There before me was a great multitude that no one could count, from every nation, tribe, people, and language.”

Turning to Revelation today we get a beautiful picture of heaven and worship. To be it is beautiful for two reasons. The first beauty I read of is the kaleidescope of people: a great multitude that no one could count, from every nation, tribe, people, and language.” Because the count is beyond anyone’s ability to record, I am reminded of the vastness of God’s love. I choose to believe the word “every.”

The second beauty I read of in today’s passage is the worship that happens in heaven. All there – the great multitude, the angels, the elders, the four living creatures – they all fall down and worship God. I cannot imagine the power in that praise choir’s songs. The most powerful worship we’ve ever experienced will hardly compare! The praise and adoration of God will be amazing.

Imagine for a moment what that will be like. Imagine being one of a countless choir worshipping the Lord our God. What a glorious day it will be. Tomorrow, as we gather to worship God, may we remember this heavenly worship and may we worship the Lord our God in this way too!

Prayer: Lord God, all power and glory and might and honor are yours! You reign forever and ever! Amen!


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Focus

Reading: Philippians 3:10-14

Verses 10-11: “I want to know Christ and the power of his resurrection… to attain to the resurrection from the dead.”

Continuing on in Philippians 3, Paul looks back on his credentials and considers them “loss for the sake of Christ.” He sees those titles and roles as “rubbish” compared to “the surpassing greatness of knowing Christ Jesus as my Lord.” Paul has focused his life on his relationship with Jesus. Paul has learned that what he used to think was righteous – following every letter of the Law and persecuting those who did not – wasn’t really righteousness. Through his relationship with Jesus he has discovered true righteousness – one that “comes through faith.” It is found in the heart, not in the head. It is found in grace and mercy and love, not in how one follows the rules.

At times our identity or how we identify others can limit how we see, treat, love, minister to others. If we allow our identity to limit us in these areas, we become less effective than we could be for Christ. If, for example, I place “pastor” ahead of “Christ-follower” in how I see myself, then I will be less effective for the gospel. In a similar way, if I look at certain people and see them as unworthy of my time and love, creating in me an unwillingness to serve or minister to them, then I have become much less effective. If I do not first and foremost see others as a beloved child of God, then I have become a stumbling block.

This is where Paul was when functioning as a “Hebrew of Hebrews… as legalistic… blameless.” Recognizing Christ as Lord and Savior, Paul instead poured himself out, giving up all earthly credentials. In verses 10 and 11 he writes this of his new focus: “I want to know Christ and the power of his resurrection… to attain to the resurrection from the dead.” Christ has become his all in all. The passage closes with Paul’s “why”. He desires to continue“straining” toward the goal. He strives to “press on” to one day take hold of the “prize for which God has called me heavenward.” The “prize” for Paul and for all who follow Christ is to attain eternal life. Accordingly, may all we do and say be focused on this goal – both for ourselves and for all who do not yet know Jesus Christ as Lord and Savior.

Prayer: Lord God, keep my eyes on the prize. Doing so, use me well in my day to day service to you and to others. In and through me may all see and hear of your love and of the call to life eternal. Amen.


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On Earth as It Is…

Reading: Philippians 3:17-4:1

Verse 20: “Our citizenship is in heaven.”

As followers of Jesus Christ we all have an eternal inheritance. In today’s passage Paul puts it this way: “Our citizenship is in heaven.” Paul is speaking to a time yet to come for us. Many have experienced what he is speaking of. We are told in scripture that heaven will be a kaleidoscope of people from every race, tongue, and nation. The great multitude will reflect our world in all its diversity. This is great news, isn’t it? Hallelujah and amen!!

While the promise of eternity in God’s presence is indeed wonderful and glorious, don’t we pray ‘on earth as it is in heaven’ at least each Sunday? Didn’t Jesus come not just to open the way to heaven but also to bring the kingdom of God here to the earth? In light of the honest answers to these questions, we can see that while we believe these things to be true, we don’t necessarily seek to live them out.

Paul’s initial audience was the church in Philippi. It was a city in the Roman empire so the average person in Philippi enjoyed the rights and privileges of Roman citizenship, much as you and I enjoy the rights and privileges of American citizenship. Much of the early church, though, was made up of slaves and others from the lower rungs of society. They did not enjoy the rights and privileges of membership in the earthly kingdom. News of citizenship – of belonging, of being equals, of having worth – this news would bring great hope to those largely without. Imagine hearing these words from their perspective. Great news, huh?! Hallelujah and amen!!

And while this is indeed wonderful and glorious news for many, there are people who truly love Jesus that at least feel outside of or excluded from our communities of faith. And there are people who don’t yet know Jesus but do need his love and grace and transforming power. Many of these also feel outside or excluded. So, the question is: how do you and I better reflect ‘on earth as it is in heaven?’ How do you and I live and act and think and speak in ways that offer belonging, equity, and worth to all people, flinging wide open the doors to the kingdom of heaven here on this earth?

Prayer: Lord God, may your love and justice roll down like a mighty river. May your love for all people, all created by you in your image, be manifest in our churches and in our lives. Amen.


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Eternal Salvation

Reading: Isaiah 25: 6-9

Verse 9: “This is the Lord, we trusted in him; let us rejoice and be glad in his salvation.”

Photo credit: Timo Volz

Today is All Saint’s Day so we depart from the lectionary readings for this week to read from Isaiah 25. This church holiday expresses thanks for the saints who have come before. Some churches celebrated this holiday yesterday and some will celebrate this upcoming Sunday as we remember those who impacted our lives of faith.

Our verses from Isaiah speak of a coming day. These words speak of the day when we will all be in the presence of God. For some of us that will be the moment after we draw our last breath here in earth. For some it will be when the clouds roll back and Jesus returns in glory. On that day we will join the Lord at “a feast of rich food for all people’s.” On that day the Lord will “destroy the shroud” – the shroud of death, the shroud of sin, the shroud of hate and evil, the shroud of division… All that separates us from God and from one another will be no more as God “wipes away the tears” and “removes the disgrace” of all the faithful.

For those who have gone on to glory, they have experienced the truth of verse nine. From the other side of the veil they have come to know that “This is the Lord, we trusted in him; let us rejoice and be glad in his salvation.” Standing in the glory of the Lord they have had their trust fulfilled. They have begun to rejoice in their eternal salvation. God’s mercy, grace, and love have carried them through this life and on into the glorious presence of the Lord.

Yes, there is a sadness to All Saint’s Day as we are reminded of our human loss. There is also a great joy as we celebrate those who have attained their eternal rest and as we look forward to feasting at the heavenly banquet and praising the Lord for our eternal salvation. Thanks be to God for the mercy, grace, and love that sees us through this life and on into glory.

Prayer: Lord God, thank you for each saint who has helped shape and form my faith. Thank you for those who have poured faith into my heart. Use me to pour faith into the lives of others each day. Amen.


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Eternal Salvation

Reading: Isaiah 25: 6-9

Verse 9: “This is the Lord, we trusted in him; let us rejoice and be glad in his salvation.”

Photo credit: Timo Volz

Today is All Saint’s Day so we depart from the lectionary readings for this week to read from Isaiah 25. This church holiday expresses thanks for the saints who have come before. Some churches celebrated this holiday yesterday and some will celebrate this upcoming Sunday as we remember those who impacted our lives of faith.

Our verses from Isaiah speak of a coming day. These words speak of the day when we will all be in the presence of God. For some of us that will be the moment after we draw our last breath here in earth. For some it will be when the clouds roll back and Jesus returns in glory. On that day we will join the Lord at “a feast of rich food for all people’s.” On that day the Lord will “destroy the shroud” – the shroud of death, the shroud of sin, the shroud of hate and evil, the shroud of division… All that separates us from God and from one another will be no more as God “wipes away the tears” and “removes the disgrace” of all the faithful.

For those who have gone on to glory, they have experienced the truth of verse nine. From the other side of the veil they have come to know that “This is the Lord, we trusted in him; let us rejoice and be glad in his salvation.” Standing in the glory of the Lord they have had their trust fulfilled. They have begun to rejoice in their eternal salvation. God’s mercy, grace, and love have carried them through this life and on into the glorious presence of the Lord.

Yes, there is a sadness to All Saint’s Day as we are reminded of our human loss. There is also a great joy as we celebrate those who have attained their eternal rest and as we look forward to feasting at the heavenly banquet and praising the Lord for our eternal salvation. Thanks be to God for the mercy, grace, and love that sees us through this life and on into glory.

Prayer: Lord God, thank you for each saint who has helped shape and form my faith. Thank you for those who have poured faith into my heart. Use me to pour faith into the lives of others each day. Amen.


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The Kingdom of Love

Reading: Psalm 48

Verse 9: “We ponder your steadfast love, O God, in the midst of the temple”.

Today we return to Psalm 48. For the psalmist, for the Israelites, God and nation were almost one. Kings were truly anointed by God and the scriptures were to guide all of life, from the highest king to the lowest peasant. This Psalm celebrates God’s presence with the people and with the nation of Israel. They were God’s “chosen people” and Zion was viewed as God’s dwelling place. Reading verse nine from this perspective, we can see and understand the connection between God and the Israelites. It was an intimate relationship, a personal and communal connection.

On this day when we celebrate our nation’s birth and the ideals that it was founded on, may we first celebrate our Christian roots. May we celebrate our high views of justice, equality, democracy, and fairness. May we rejoice that we are able to freely worship the Lord our God without fear and without threat of oppression. Thanks be to God.

Yet we cannot stop with celebration. As people of faith, we know that all people and all nations are held in God’s grace and are within his judgment. Our greatest purpose as believers and as communities of faith is to fulfill and to help realize Jesus’ vision of the kingdom of God here on earth. That kingdom is one that truly practices and upholds justice, equality, and fairness as it values and cares well for all of creation. It is a kingdom ultimately built upon love, not on power or might or human strength. As citizens of heaven first, may we celebrate the freedom we find in Christ as we seek to build the kingdom of love here on earth.

Prayer: Lord God, you are my all in all. In you I find my identity and my worth. In you is my hope and my salvation. Use me to help build a kingdom here on earth that always reflects your love and grace. Amen.


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When I Am Weak

Reading: 2nd Corinthians 12: 2-10

Verse 9: “My grace is sufficient for you, for my power is made perfect in weakness”.

Photo credit: Jon Tyson

As our passage today begins, Paul speaks of himself in the third person. He tells of a “man” who has a grand vision of heaven. There he witnessed “inexpressible things”. Paul could choose to tell all about this vision but he refrains. He does not want others to “think more of me” than they should. Paul’s language here reminds me of those ‘just asking for a friend’ questions we give or receive once in a while.

In our time many are drawn to leaders with awesome resumes, excellent credentials, and/or with amazing charisma and leadership skills. It was not any different in Paul’s day. There is never a shortage of people that want to lead or that think they are just the best leader ever. Both are in great supply. Paul could have boasted of his encounter with the risen Lord or of his vision of heaven. Instead he admits his weakness and his brokenness. He chooses the path of humility. Paul shares that he has a “thorn” in his flesh. It torments him and he has begged God to take it away. God will not. The Lord instead tells him, “My grace is sufficient for you, for my power is made perfect in weakness”. The Lord allows the thorn to stay to remind Paul again and again that he’s not perfect, that he’s not the greatest thing since sliced bread. Paul can think back to his Pharisee days and say, ‘I once knew a guy like that…’

Paul was found by Christ and has matured in his faith. He now knows that when he is weak, Christ is strong. When insult or persecution or hardship comes, Paul now relies even more on Jesus Christ. It is then that Paul finds strength. It is then that we are strong too – when we rely on and trust in Christ. In humble faith may we ever turn to the only one who can save: Jesus Christ.

Prayer: Lord God, in Paul I see Jesus’ humble servant’s attitude. When I look within, may my life and leadership reflect this same grace and humility. Remind me of my flaws and weaknesses when I think too much of self. Thank you God. Amen.