pastorjohnb

Thoughts and musings on faith and our mighty God!


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“Home” to God

Reading: Ruth 1: 1-6

Verse 6: “When she heard in Moab that the Lord had come to the aid of God’s people… Naomi prepared to return home.

Photo credit: Milo Weiler

Today we get the back story of what we studied yesterday – Ruth claiming Naomi, her people, and her God. We learn that it was a famine in Judah that led Naomi, her husband, and two sons to move to Moab. They settled there and made a life for themselves. The father dies and the two sons marry Moabite women, becoming further connected to this foreign land. Even though now a widow, Naomi is still surrounded by her sons and new daughters-in-law. After ten years both sons die. In verse six we again read, “When she heard in Moab that the Lord had come to the aid of God’s people… Naomi prepared to return home.

When we move someplace new we settle in, make new friends, find a church home. We become connected and form relationships. For many of us, though, there is a sense that “home” is still back there somewhere. Maybe that place is where we were born and grew up. Maybe that place is where we raised our children. I think this is what Naomi felt about Bethlehem in Judah. They had moved to find food. We move to find employment, to live where our new spouse lives, to go to college…

After these three losses Naomi hears that God has provided once again for Judah. Naomi and her two daughters-in-law prepare to move to Judah. It is a reset for Naomi. She can leave behind this place associated with grief and death. We too can want to leave these places of hurt to return home, to where we feel loved and cared for and connected. Judah is also the place that God dwells – for Naomi and the people of this time. To return to Judah is also to connect with God. We too do this in our times of suffering and loss. We connect to God and to God’s people, finding comfort and care in the family of God. We too come “home” to God.

Prayer: God, your door is always open. Your love always calls out to us. Home is a place we find shelter from the storms of life. Thank you for friends and family that also love on us in our times of need. Thank you for your open arms that always embrace us. Amen.


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Trust in God

Reading: Ruth 1: 7-18

Verse 16: “Where you go, I will go… Your people will be my people and your God my God.”

Photo credit: Einar Storsul

In our passage for today Naomi decides to return home to Judah. She has lost her husband and her two sons. Going back home is the logical step. Just as the journey is beginning she tells her two daughters-in-law, “Go back, each of you…” They are young and may be able to find husbands in their homeland of Moab. That would be better than three widows all going to Judah.

Initially Orpah and Ruth decide to stick with Naomi. Again she urges her daughters-in-law to stay in Moab, to be where their people are. Orpah sees the logic and kisses Naomi goodbye. Ruth is again urged to do as her sister-in-law has done: “Go back with her.” It makes sense for a widow to stay with her family, to remain where people love and will care for her. To go to a foreign land, as a complete stranger, as a widow – it doesn’t make much sense.

We, like Orpah, prefer the comfortable, the safe, the known. We like our routines and we tend to like to preserve the status quo. For most of us change is unsettling and disconcerting. When faced with a hard decision, like Orpah and Ruth were, we usually choose the easier way, the path of least resistance. What led Ruth to decide as she did? Ruth states, “Where you go, I will go… Your people will be my people and your God my God.”

Out of a deep sense of love Ruth commits to journey with Naomi. Even though the future is uncertain, she commits to Naomi. And she commits to God. Being around Naomi for at least ten years, Ruth has observed Naomi’s faith. At this points Ruth commits to Naomi and to God. Ruth trusts in God as they begin their journey. In those difficult moments in our lives, may we do the same.

Prayer: Lord God, you call me to trust in you, to walk in faith. In those moments, when it feels uncomfortable or unsure, speak clearly into my heart so I may know the way to go. Amen.


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Set Free to Serve

Reading: Hebrews 9: 11-14

Verse 14: “How much more, then, will the blood of Christ… cleanse our conscience from acts that lead to death, so that we may serve the living God.”

Drilling down a little deeper into the passage that we began to work with yesterday, today we focus in on the new covenant. In the Old Testament sacrificial system the blood or ashes of sacrificed animals made the people ceremonially clean. Through these sacrifices the people were made outwardly clean and could return to communal life. The life of the animal paid the atoning price for their sin. But the guilt and the shame and the regret remained; the forgiveness was never complete. The sin remained a mark on them. Yes, it was ceremonially covered by the blood or ashes of the animal, but the blemish remained.

In verse fourteen we read about the difference made in the new covenant. Here we read, “How much more, then, will the blood of Christ… cleanse our conscience from acts that lead to death, so that we may serve the living God.” This unblemished, perfect sacrifice chose to die in our place, taking upon himself the sins of the world. Jesus’ blood, poured out in perfect sacrifice, washes away our sin and the guilt, shame, regret, doubt, fear… connected to our sin. Through the new covenant we are not only forgiven but we are made new. Our sins are no more according to God. Our sins are washed away; no blemish or mark or spot remains. We are made new again, holy and perfect in God’s sight. At least for a time we stand as the image of Christ himself.

The new covenant allows us to go forward to “serve the living God.” We are freed to go out as Christ in the world, offering his words of wholeness, healing, and restoration to others. This gift of mercy and grace and forgiveness and redemption is not ours to simply sit on or to cherish for ourselves. This great gift is ours to share, to proclaim to the world. Christ has set us free! May we share this good news today!!

Prayer: Loving and living God, consuming fire, cleanse the sun from my life. Draw me into your deep grace and fill me with it so that I can bring grace out into the world. As I have been reconciled, use me to reconcile others to you and to one another. Amen.


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Jesus Opened the Way

Reading: Hebrews 9: 11-14

Verse 12: “He entered the Most Holy Place once for all with his own blood, having obtained eternal redemption.”

In our passage from Hebrews we read more about our great high priest. In this week’s passage the author continues to develop this theme and role that Jesus plays. The priesthood and sacrificial system were central to the faith of the Hebrews. Ever since the time of Aaron, Moses’ brother, the priest was the connection point to God and the sacrificial system was the means to forgiveness of sins. At the time of this writing, the author was demonstrating how all of this changed because of Jesus’ sacrifice.

For the Jews the temple was the center of their faith. God’s presence resided in the Holy of Holies. Only the high priest could enter this space and only once per year. The high priest would enter on the Day of Atonement to sprinkle blood on the ark of the covenant. The blood from the sacrifice would ‘pay’ for the sins of the people. Year after year the high priest would enter the Most Holy Place to atone for sins. All of this changed for the Jews through the sacrifice of Jesus on the cross. In verse twelve we read, “He entered the Most Holy Place once for all with his own blood, having obtained eternal redemption.” As Jesus breathed his last on the cross the curtain was torn in two, opening access to the Most Holy Place. Jesus’ blood replaced the blood of the ram “once for all.”

Jesus opened the way to God. We no longer need a priest to offer sacrifices for our sin or for the sins of the people. We can go directly to God any time and any place. We can enter God’s holy presence, offering repentance as we confess our sins. Pledging a more holy walk with God, we are confident that the blood of Jesus washes away our sin. The redemption that Jesus offers is eternal, unending, forever. We can claim freedom from our sin through the sacrifice of Christ over and over and over. Thanks be to God for the grace that is freely offered through Jesus Christ our Lord.

Prayer: Lord God, thank you for what you gave up for me, for us. Thank you for the sacrifice of your perfect Son for our sins, for my sins. It is such a wonderful gift to be able to come to you 24/7. You are always there for us all. What an amazing gift of love! Amen.


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Eye on Jesus

Reading: Hebrews 7: 23-28

Verse 26: “Such a high priest meets our needs – one who is holy, blameless, pure, set apart from sinners, exalted above the heavens.”

Today in Hebrews 7 we read about Jesus Christ, our priest forever. While in ministry on earth Jesus provided us an example for how to live out and live into God’s perfect love. Unlike earthly priests, Jesus was raised to new life and “because Jesus lives forever he has a permanent priesthood.” Jesus continues his saving work in heaven “because he always lives to intercede” for you and for me. Jesus prays for you and for me on a continual basis, ever bringing us before God.

In verse 26 we read, “Such a high priest meets our needs – one who is holy, blameless, pure, set apart from sinners, exalted above the heavens.” This list is quite the list! It is also the example that we are called to follow, the footsteps that we must walk in. If this list feels intimidating or if it seems impossible we must remember that Jesus himself is praying for us – for us to be faithful disciples, for us to love God and others well, for us to be forgiven when we sin, for us to be strengthened when tempted, for us to be comforted when in sorrow, for us to… The one who died to save us is praying for us on our journey of faith.

To be holy, blameless, pure… is a high calling. But we are called to a high calling: to be like Christ. Jesus is for us; he is on our side. We know that with God all things are possible. Therefore let us keep our eye on Jesus, seeking to live as his faithful disciple day by day.

Prayer: Lord God, empower me to model Jesus Christ today. Help me to be love lived out, to be grace poured out freely. In and through me may others see and come to know Jesus Christ, the author and perfector of our faith. Amen.


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Eye on Jesus

Reading: Hebrews 7: 23-28

Verse 26: “Such a high priest meets our needs – one who is holy, blameless, pure, set apart from sinners, exalted above the heavens.”

Today in Hebrews 7 we read about Jesus Christ, our priest forever. While in ministry on earth Jesus provided us an example for how to live out and live into God’s perfect love. Unlike earthly priests, Jesus was raised to new life and “because Jesus lives forever he has a permanent priesthood.” Jesus continues his saving work in heaven “because he always lives to intercede” for you and for me. Jesus prays for you and for me on a continual basis, ever bringing us before God.

In verse 26 we read, “Such a high priest meets our needs – one who is holy, blameless, pure, set apart from sinners, exalted above the heavens.” This list is quite the list! It is also the example that we are called to follow, the footsteps that we must walk in. If this list feels intimidating or if it seems impossible we must remember that Jesus himself is praying for us – for us to be faithful disciples, for us to love God and others well, for us to be forgiven when we sin, for us to be strengthened when tempted, for us to be comforted when in sorrow, for us to… The one who died to save us is praying for us on our journey of faith.

To be holy, blameless, pure… is a high calling. But we are called to a high calling: to be like Christ. Jesus is for us; he is on our side. We know that with God all things are possible. Therefore let us keep our eye on Jesus, seeking to live as his faithful disciple day by day.

Prayer: Lord God, empower me to model Jesus Christ today. Help me to be love lived out, to be grace poured out freely. In and through me may others see and come to know Jesus Christ, the author and perfector of our faith. Amen.


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Helping Others

Reading: Luke 10: 46-52

Verse 51: “The blind man said, ‘Rabbi, I want to see.'”

Jesus stops as the cries of blind Bartimaeus reaches his ears. He tells the crowd to call him here. Bartimaeus throws off his cloak, jumps up, and comes to Jesus. He is excited because Jesus has heard him, has stopped, and is focusing on him. Imagine how the blind man’s heart was racing at this moment!

Once he navigates his way to Jesus, a simple question is asked: “What do you want me to do for you?” But before we get to Bartimaeus’ response, I wonder what was going through the crowd’s minds. What were those who had tried to hush up Bartimaeus thinking and feeling? Were the hushers still hard of heart? What were others in the crowd with illnesses or hardships thinking and feeling? Were these others who lived on the fringes suddenly hopeful?

Bartimaeus simply says, “I want to see.” He is asking Jesus to remove this barrier, this limitation. He wants to experience life in a fuller, new way. Many of us look the Jesus in this way. For some it is for a physical healing. For some it is for healing from an addiction or a harmful relationship. For some it is to be healed of our sin and to be made right again. The darkness that we are all in from time to time leads us all to cry out to Jesus.

The blind man is healed with a word from Jesus. His faith in Jesus brings him healing. Bartimaeus’ response is a joyful one – he follows Jesus as they head down the road. He wants to be a part of this energy, of this movement. This too is how we should respond to Jesus’ healing and saving touch. Following in his footsteps, sharing the good news, helping others to see and walk in the light – may this be our grateful response to Jesus!

Prayer: Lord God, how often have you healed me from my brokenness, how often have you restored me to right relationship with you and with others in my life. Help me to follow as Bartimaeus did, leading others toward the healer, the redeemer, the rock. Amen.


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Shout It

Reading: Mark 10: 46-52

Verse 48: “Many rebuked him and told him to be quiet, but he shouted out all the more, ‘Jesus, son of David, have mercy on me!'”

Throughout the gospels Jesus takes time often to interact with those on the margins and fringes of society. These acts of kindness and mercy built up his popularity. I’d imagine almost everyone had heard of Jesus and of the amazing teachings and healings that came from him. After spending some time in Jericho, Jesus and the disciples are leaving the city to continue their ministry. There is a new destination ahead.

Bartimaeus is blind, not deaf or mute. He hears a crowd coming along the road and he surmises that Jesus is passing by. Bartimaeus shouts out to get Jesus’ attention. But in verse 48 we read, “Many rebuked him and told him to be quiet.” The people around him want to quiet Bartimaeus. What would possibly lead people to prevent a man from potential healing? What would lead them to try and keep him in his disabled state? Sometimes we like to have people below us in society. They make us feel better about ourselves. Sometimes we don’t want the down and out to shout aloud – it reminds us of our call to care for the least of these. Sometimes we prefer for those in the margins and fringes to stay there. When they draw attention to their cause we become uncomfortable because the injustice or oppression or abuse tugs at our hearts, prompting us towards action.

Ignoring those around him, those trying to quiet him for whatever reason, Bartimaeus “shouted out all the more, ‘Jesus, son of David, have mercy on me!'” In faith he seems the one that can heal him. In that same faith may we call out when we are in need, especially when we choose to be blind or mute or deaf to the ills and struggles around us. In that same faith may we choose to walk with and to support those in need of Jesus, our healer, our hope, our redeemer. In faith may it be so.

Prayer: Lord God, use me as a voice for the weak and powerless, for the outcast and marginalized. Make me quick to recognize their needs and steady to respond in love and compassion. As you have blessed me may I be a blessing to others. Amen.


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Old and Blessed

Reading: Job 42: 10-17

Verse 17: “And so he died, old and full of years.”

As we conclude our time in Job it seems we’ve come full circle. By the end of our reading, Job’s fortunes and family have been restored in abundance. In verse twelve we read, “The Lord blessed the latter part of Job’s life more than the first.” On the surface this is true. But to dig a little deeper reveals that much has changed.

Job is very different than when this journey began. As I wrote about yesterday, the eye of Job’s heart now sees God for who God is. The God that he thought he knew in his mind has become fully present in his heart. The pain and grief that Job walked through may have subsided a bit but the hurt will always be there. The love for his first children will not be replaced by his new children. For example, when Jemimah reminds him of one of his daughters who died, tears will flow and his heart will ache. Job does move forward with his life, one very blessed by God, but he does so with deep scars. Job himself has been changed too. He now more fully understands God and the love of God for all parts of creation – from the ravens God feeds to his friends that God rebukes in verses 7-9.

Modeling the love of God that Job himself now fully knows, he prays for his friends. Previous to his time of suffering this may have been too much to ask of Job’s surface level faith. The faith that only resided in his mind and that was driven by a fear of punishment would have struggled to pray for these men who added to his suffering. The Job whose heart sees the full scope of God’s love and mercy easily prays for these friends. It is a love and mercy that Job wants them to know as well. So Job ministers to his friends. This is a much different Job than the one who made his first set of children offer sacrifices for their possible bad behavior. Job now offers his friends forgiveness and a new relationship with God from a place of love, not fear. Walking with God in a loving and intimate relationship, our story concludes with these words: “And so he died, old and full of years.” Old and full of years. Old and blessed because of a personal relationship with God. May it be so for you and for me!

Prayer: Lord God, it’s awesome that Job was totally restored and then some. The true blessing was the personal and intimate relationship with you. Possessions, titles, money, popularity – all nice but none are guarantees of a good life. A life that is good and pleasing to you is one that is full of love, peace, hope, joy, grace, forgiveness, kindness, mercy, contentment… Guide me to these treasures, O Lord. Amen.


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Deeper, Stronger

Reading: Job 42: 1-6

Verse 5: “My ears had heard of you but now my eyes see you.”

Job has lived a righteous and upright life. God allowed Satan to test Job’s faith. He remained faithful. Job’s wife and friends add to his suffering with accusations and condemnations. Job longs to have an audience with God, to state his case. God responds to Job in a long speech that leaves Job humbled and with a new understanding of God. Today we read Job’s response.

Job begins by acknowledging that God “can do all things” and that “no plan of yours can be thwarted.” Job has taken in the immensity of God’s power and the depth of God’s creative might. In the complexity of the created world and in the detailed order of animal life, God has done some amazing and awesome work. God speaks of the behemoth and the leviathan – two creatures with great power that are feared by humanity. These creatures are far outside of man’s control but well within God’s. God asks, “Can you make a pet of him?” No, God, certainly not. In response Job says, “Surely I spoke of things I did not understand, things too wonderful for me.” Job recognizes his place in God’s world. Along with all of humanity, Job realized that he was not the center of all things.

Job has been changed by this encounter with God. In reality Job knew God and followed God’s ways at least as well as any other human being on the earth. God lifted him up to Satan as an example of faith. But as God spoke out of the whirlwind, Job came to know God in a deeper and more intimate way. In verse five Job declares, “My ears had heard of you but now my eyes see you.” Job had worshiped and followed a God that he thought was powerful, awesome, worthy of his praise. Now Job sees God in a clearer way. Job now knows that God is all these things and so much more. His connection to God is now so much deeper, so much more profound, so much stronger. Job’s faith in God has grown. As we delve into the word, as we allow the Holy Spirit to lead and guide our lives, as we strive to follow Jesus’ example, our faith will grow deeper, the connection will become stronger. May it be so as we walk closely with the Lord our God day by day.

Prayer: Lord God, like Job, the more I know you, the longer I walk with you, the more awed and amazed I become. My faith journey has been filled with moments when I’ve come to know you more intimately, to love you more deeply, to praise you more sincerely. Continue to journey with me, ever allowing my eyes and heart to see and know you more clearly. Amen.