pastorjohnb

Thoughts and musings on faith and our mighty God!


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Lean In

Reading: Psalm 107:1-6

Verse 1: “Give thanks to the Lord, for God is good; God’s love endures forever.”

God is always present, always there to love and care for us. God guides us and protects us from evil. Because of our relationship with God we often expect life to be good and blessed. We are often surprised when tragedies or suffering comes our way. We feel disoriented and unsure. We can question God as we come to feel like those in the Psalm, those whose “lives ebbed away.”

In times of suffering and pain it can be a time of testing for our faith. If we see God as a God who primarily gives us what we want, then we can feel abandoned by God in hard times. We can get angry at God and maybe even distance ourselves from God. But if we see God as a God of love and care and compassion, then we choose to lean into God in times that are hard. We recall times when God was present during our trials and we lean into these memories and experiences.

We can also look to Jesus, to the one who modeled leaning into God better than anyone. The greater the trial, the harder Jesus leaned into God. Christ held onto hope and trusted that God would always be there with all he needed for that moment. He cried out to God and God walked with him. Even in the valley, Jesus declared as the psalmist did, “Give thanks to the Lord, for God is good; God’s love endures forever.” May we do so as well.

Prayer: Lord God, when we are hurting and suffering, help us to draw near to you. When life rages and we feel like joining in, pour out your peace upon our hearts. Call us to draw close, to enter into your tender and gentle love. You are all we need. Amen.


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Choose

Reading: Luke 10:38-42

Verse 40: “Martha was distracted by all the preparations that had to be made.”

Photo credit: Robert Bye

At the end of Luke 10 Jesus visits the home of Martha, Mary, and Lazarus. Martha, we read, opens her home to Jesus. Her home would become a favorite and regular place to stop on the way in and out of Jerusalem. They would become good friends.

As Jesus and his disciples relax and settle in, Mary joins them as Jesus begins to share with the group. We assume Lazarus was there too. Mary makes the choice to be in Jesus’ presence. Martha does not. In verse 40 we read that “Martha was distracted by all the preparations that had to be made.” Sleeping quarters must be made ready, there is a meal to provide – so much to get ready! Martha feels responsible.

We too can feel responsible. There are always deadlines and things that need done. We too can feel really busy. After all, it is what our world expects. Busyness is highly prized in our culture. It’s a sign of success and productivity. So we fill our lives and our schedules, not leaving a free moment. We can easily become like Martha. I’d really like to go to church but I have so much to do. Sure, I’d love to serve on that team, but I don’t think I can free up that one hour a month. Sorry, all 168 hours each week are spoken for.

While things like work and sleep and time with family and friends are all important, even necessary, Mary chose the “better thing.” She was intentional about taking time to be in Jesus’ presence. Jesus acknowledges Martha’s busyness and reminds her that “only one thing is needed” – time with the Lord. Each day may we choose as Mary did.

Prayer: Lord God, help me to keep margin in my life. Guard my heart and mind against busyness. May you be my priority. Amen.


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God with Us, Christ in Us

Reading: Colossians 1:24-28

Verse 27: “God has chosen to make known among the Gentiles the glorious riches of this mystery, which is Christ in you, the hope of glory.”

Continuing in Colossians 1 today, Paul rejoices that Christ suffered for us. It was a suffering that was willingly endured to defeat the power of sin and death. It was also necessary so that we could experience the mystery that has been “disclosed to the saints.”

To me, we need God more than ever. Our time is challenging and difficult. There is great division and divisive thinking: if you are not completely with us, you are against us and you are absolutely wrong. It hasn’t always been like this. Yes, we’ve always had varied opinions and thoughts on this, that, and the other thing. We’ve not always seen eye to eye. The world has always been a messy place. God in Christ was willing to enter our messy world to show us a better way to live with and to love one another.

Our world needs more love, more compassion, more understanding, more empathy. Our world needs Jesus. Our world needs forgiveness and restoration, healing and unity. Our world needs Jesus. In our text for today, Paul recognized that he was commissioned to make Christ known. Jesus commissioned all who believe to do the same thing as we seek to make disciples of Christ. This feels like a hard task. God is with us. In verse 27 we read, “God has chosen to make known among the Gentiles the glorious riches of this mystery, which is Christ in you, the hope of glory.” Christ dwells in us. The Spirit fills us with the hope of Christ, the hope of glory. God is with us. Our world needs Jesus. May we connect others to Christ.

Prayer: Lord God, where there is division, may I bring peace and empathy. Where there is anger, may I bring compassion and understanding. Where there is brokenness, may I bring healing and wholeness. Lord, you fill me with your Spirit. Go with me today as I strive to bring others into a saving relationship with Jesus Christ. Amen.


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“Hear this…”

Reading: Amos 8:1-6

Verse 4: “Hear this, you who trample the needy and do away with the poor of the land.”

Photo credit: Nick Sarro

We continue this week with Amos. Last week God used a plumb line to reveal how askew or crooked the Israelites had become. In this week’s reading from Amos 8, God reveals some details. As our passage opens, God shows Amos a basket of fruit. The fruit is ripe, maybe even appealing – at first glance. When one looks closer, however, one can see the rot along the edges. Using this analogy, God says, “The time is ripe for my people; I will spare them no longer.” We all know what happens when you leave rotting fruit in the bowl with good fruit. It will all go bad. It is time to deal with the rot.

In verse 4 God speaks to the rot: “Hear this, you who trample the needy and do away with the poor of the land.” The Sabbath is a farce. The powerful go through the motions, anxious for it to end so that they can return to making dishonest profits and to trading on the lives of the poor and needy. Selfishly living they ignored the needs of their brothers and sisters. We too can play these games. I’ve gone to church and spent the whole time thinking about that afternoon or the week ahead. I’ve given the homeless man a granola bar or a bottle of water while tightly clinging to that wad of cash in my pocket.

God declares that their songs will turn to wailing. Bodies will be strewn everywhere. This brings to mind recent images of responses to times when those with power have abused or oppressed those without power. Punishment will surely come for being selfish and ignoring the plight of those on the margins. God will not stand for such evil. What would Amos tell us about how we live and about how we treat those in need around us? How could we better reflect God’s heart for all people?

Prayer: Lord, guide my eyes to look beyond myself. Lead me to be more generous, more willing with all that you’ve blessed me with. Amen.


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Be Patient, Extend Grace

Reading: Luke 9:51-56

Verse 51: “Jesus resolutely set out for Jerusalem.”

As Jesus’ time on earth draws near to a close he “resolutely set out for Jerusalem.” Knowing what lies ahead, Jesus is committed to God’s plan. The abuse, the false accusations, the beatings, the nails, the weight of the sin of the world, the separation from God – Jesus knows every detail about what lies ahead in Jerusalem. And he resolutely sets off for Jerusalem. In this life we too will face trials; we too will deal with pain and rejection. As modeled by Christ, we too must resolve to walk in faith and to trust into God’s plans for us and for our lives.

Along the way Jesus is rejected by a Samaritan village. They are not his focus so they will not welcome him for an overnight. We too will encounter such people. If it’s not all about them then there is little room for Jesus or faith or whatever else we can offer. James and John are offended by this reality and want to “call down fire from heaven.” Jesus rebukes them and they move on to another village. I’d guess that Jesus was reminding James and John to be patient, to extend grace. This too is a good reminder for us.

If we are willing to extend ourselves, to engage the world out there, we will cross paths with people in need of Jesus. Some will recognize the impact that Jesus has on our lives and will want the same for themselves. Others, however, will not be ready for Jesus and they will reject him and us. Some people are ready for the Holy Spirit to move in their lives, some are not. In all cases may we be patient and may we extend grace. May it be so in the days ahead.

Prayer: Lord God, we rejoice in all that we have and find in you. Guide us by your love and by the power of the Holy Spirit to be sharers of our relationship with you. In doing so may others be open to a relationship with you. Amen.


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Righteousness and Justice

Reading: Psalm 97

Verse 2: “Righteousness and justice are the foundation of God’s throne.”

Psalm 97 is a call towards faithful living and away from sin and idols. It is a recognition of God’s power – found both in the consuming fire and in the protection of “the upright in heart.” The concepts of righteousness and justice apply to those who love God. These are not just ideas that God likes or favors. They are the foundation of God’s love and our love. I am draw to these because both of these concepts are deeply rooted in traditional Methodist beliefs and practices.

Personal holiness and social justice are two cornerstones of the Methodist tradition. This is true of many other traditions as well. While some have Methodist roots, in reality, it is what Jesus taught and practiced himself. As his faith matured a young John Wesley began to deeply explore his personal faith. Beginning in college as a part of what was known as the “Holy Club”, reading scripture and praying daily became central to Wesley’s faith or personal holiness. Later, as his methods spread and Methodism took root, he formed groups and classes that met primarily to hold one another accountable in their Christian walk of faith.

Wesley’s personal holiness led him out into the world, where he became aware of the plight of many: the illiterate, the poor, the imprisoned, the sick, the working class, the orphans, and the widows. He began to love these as Jesus would love them. Wesley became a vocal and financial champion of those in need of education, basic health care, safe working conditions, and the basic necessities of food and shelter. In many ways he was a social justice warrior. His personal holiness and intimate relationship with Jesus fueled his passion for social justice. Here he found the center of Christian love. May we do so as well.

Prayer: Lord God, guide me to grow closer and closer to Jesus, deeper and deeper into your love. In turn, lead me to apply your love of all people to my life and to the world. Amen.


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Dwelling Richly, Intimately

Reading: Psalm 27:1-6

Verse 4: “One thing I ask of the Lord, this is what I seek: that I may dwell in the house of the Lord all the days of my life.”

Photo credit: Matt Botsford

In this week’s Psalm David rejoices over God’s presence in his life and he expresses the desire to always be ‘at home’ in the Lord. With God, David finds light to guide him and salvation for his soul. With God David finds protection and shelter from his enemies. David’s end result in our verses for today is to “sing and make music to the Lord” – to worship God for all that God does for and is to David.

When David says, “One thing I ask of the Lord, this is what I seek: that I may dwell in the house of the Lord all the days of my life” he is expressing a deep desire to connect to God both physically and spiritually. The tabernacle (and later the temple) was literally seen as God’s dwelling place. Just as we go to our churches to connect to God, David desires to spend time in ‘God’s house.’ But one cannot realistically spend all of one’s time in the tabernacle or at church. Life and faith also happen outside the physical building.

When we are ‘at home’ with God, whether in our churches or in our homes or out in the mountains or walking the streets, that time with God fills us spiritually. When we “gaze upon” God’s beauty and when we “sacrifice with shouts of joy” we are living out our faith. Sometimes when we do these things we aren’t in church but are out in the world, engaging others and meeting needs. We are extending the light and salvation, the protection and shelter to others. We are sharing the love of God with a world in need. Doing so, “all the days of my life,” we are dwelling richly and intimately with God, “making music to the Lord.” Thanks be to God.

Prayer: Lord God, you fill me up. Pour me out as well. Your light dwells in my heart. Shine it out into the world. You are my salvation and my hope. Reflect your love into the lives of others so that they too may know your saving grace and your eternal presence. Amen.


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Everyday Life

Reading: Luke 9:37-43

Verse 42: “Jesus rebuked the evil spirit, healed the boy, and gave him back to his father.”

Coming down from the mountain Jesus, Peter, James, and John are met with a large crowd. Imagine the different things going through their minds. Jesus would be filled with confidence, assured by his conversation with Moses and Elijah, affirmed by the words God spoke. Peter, James, and John must have been in awe, seeing and understanding Jesus on a whole new level. Maybe their minds were reeling a little bit too!

From the crowd a man cries out, drawing Jesus’ attention. The father’s only son is possessed by an evil spirit. It causes seizures and convulsions. It “scarcely ever leaves him and it is destroying him.” The father is desperate. The disciples were unable to cast out the evil spirit so the man turns to Jesus. He was probably one of many waiting for Jesus to return. As the boy responds to Jesus’ invitation to come the evil spirit throws him to the ground. In verse 42 we read, “Jesus rebuked the evil spirit, healed the boy, and gave him back to his father.” The boy is made well. A father once again has a son. All were “amazed at the greatness of God.”

As wonderful as the mountaintop experience was for Jesus, Peter, James, and John and is for us when we experience these moments, the sharing of the good news happens in everyday life. Yes, we are changed on the mountain, but we live in the ordinary. Through prayer and the living out of our faith, through the example of Jesus Christ and the guidance of the Holy Spirit, we are called to minister to the needs of the world. We are called to feed the hungry, to clothe the naked, to heal the broken, to comfort the hurting, to pray for the oppressed, wartorn, and downtrodden. We are called to be Christ to the world. May it be so for us all.

Prayer: Lord God, rend my heart for what breaks yours. Use me to bring healing, wholeness, restoration… Use me to meet needs wherever and whenever I encounter them. Help me to follow Jesus’ example. Amen.


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See? Recognize? Heed?

Reading: Malachi 3: 1-4

Verse 1: “See, I will send my messenger, who will prepare the way before me.”

Photo credit: Chase Murphy

The prophet Malachi was sent by God to the Levites, the priests. They were offering imperfect animals on the altar – the blind, the diseased, the crippled. The priests had turned from God’s ways and had “caused many to stumble.” Malachi admonishes them and tells of a coming day of judgment. As I consider God’s case against the priests, I wonder what words Malachi would relay to us today. Is our offering similar to theirs? Do we give to God a portion dedicated up front or do we wait to the end of the month to see what we have left that we can spare? Do we always live an upright and holy life or do we fall into gossip circles and other sins that diminish our witness?

Beginning in chapter three God lays out the plan for change. The detestable and unfaithful behaviors will come to an end. In verse one the Lord Almighty says, “See, I will send my messenger, who will prepare the way before me.” About 400 years later the messenger will come. John the Baptist will offer a baptism of repentance, calling the people of God to a holy and faithful life. Although it is more comfortable and much easier to stay where we are at, to pretend that our faith is okay, to act as if we have no sin in our lives, the messenger draws crowds. John spoke to the hole in people’s hearts that only God can fill. Many came to confess and repent, to be baptized and cleansed. The people saw their imperfections and longed for a deeper, better, stronger faith. They saw their need and responded to the one preparing the way for the Lord.

Do we see our need for God? Do we recognize our imperfections? Are we willing to heed the words of the prophet? Will we humbly approach the Lord of mercy and grace, seeking to be made new again?

Prayer: Lord God, give me an honest walk of faith. Open my eyes to my areas of darkness and sin. Shine your light on my failures and imperfections. Pour out your grace and mercy, drawing me closer to you. Amen.


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Servant to All

Reading: Mark 9: 30-37

Verse 35: “If anyone wants to be first, he must be the very last, and the servant of all.”

Photo credit: K. Mitch Hodge

As we delve into Mark 9 today we look at one of the conflicts within all of us. On the one hand we want to be the best. We want recognition, titles, position, power. On the other hand Jesus calls us to be “servant of all.”

The disciples are not much different than we are. Walking along to road they argued about who was the greatest disciple. As kids we argued about who was the best player on the team and about who was smartest at math. As teens we argue about who is the coolest or about who has the best car, clothes… As adults we vie for promotions and titles. We try and demonstrate our success by the homes we live in, by the cars we drive… In our own ways we desire greatness, just like the disciples did.

Jesus knows what they were arguing about. He begins to counter this desire by saying, “If anyone wants to be first, he must be the very last, and the servant of all.” The radical, counter-cultural Jesus suggests another way. This “servant of all” approach is modeled by Jesus. This call to humble service is a call to always be humble, in all circumstances and with all people. It’d be easy to be humble standing on a basketball court with Michael Jordan. It’d be much harder to do so when staring at a kid who can’t tie his shoe, much less dribble a ball. In this illustration we’d love to find something, anything, that we could do for Jordan. Humility calls us to be equally if not more willing with the awkward kid. For Jesus, all meant all.

To serve all others is not always easy. To illustrate the depth of this call, Jesus gathers a child in his arms. He challenges the disciples to welcome children as he does. Jesus takes one who is an afterthought in most places in that society and elevates them to a place of full belonging and equality. The child represents the one with great needs who cannot care for themselves. More than just children would meet this description. To care for the least and the last always requires humility wrapped in a servant’s heart. Following Jesus’ example may we too strive to serve all.

Prayer: Lord God, help me to see and love as Jesus did. Help me to see, care for, and treat all people, regardless of who or what they are, as ones to love. Grant me both a humble heart and hands and feet willing to serve. Amen.