pastorjohnb

Thoughts and musings on faith and our mighty God!


Leave a comment

Be Patient, Extend Grace

Reading: Luke 9:51-56

Verse 51: “Jesus resolutely set out for Jerusalem.”

As Jesus’ time on earth draws near to a close he “resolutely set out for Jerusalem.” Knowing what lies ahead, Jesus is committed to God’s plan. The abuse, the false accusations, the beatings, the nails, the weight of the sin of the world, the separation from God – Jesus knows every detail about what lies ahead in Jerusalem. And he resolutely sets off for Jerusalem. In this life we too will face trials; we too will deal with pain and rejection. As modeled by Christ, we too must resolve to walk in faith and to trust into God’s plans for us and for our lives.

Along the way Jesus is rejected by a Samaritan village. They are not his focus so they will not welcome him for an overnight. We too will encounter such people. If it’s not all about them then there is little room for Jesus or faith or whatever else we can offer. James and John are offended by this reality and want to “call down fire from heaven.” Jesus rebukes them and they move on to another village. I’d guess that Jesus was reminding James and John to be patient, to extend grace. This too is a good reminder for us.

If we are willing to extend ourselves, to engage the world out there, we will cross paths with people in need of Jesus. Some will recognize the impact that Jesus has on our lives and will want the same for themselves. Others, however, will not be ready for Jesus and they will reject him and us. Some people are ready for the Holy Spirit to move in their lives, some are not. In all cases may we be patient and may we extend grace. May it be so in the days ahead.

Prayer: Lord God, we rejoice in all that we have and find in you. Guide us by your love and by the power of the Holy Spirit to be sharers of our relationship with you. In doing so may others be open to a relationship with you. Amen.


Leave a comment

Righteousness and Justice

Reading: Psalm 97

Verse 2: “Righteousness and justice are the foundation of God’s throne.”

Psalm 97 is a call towards faithful living and away from sin and idols. It is a recognition of God’s power – found both in the consuming fire and in the protection of “the upright in heart.” The concepts of righteousness and justice apply to those who love God. These are not just ideas that God likes or favors. They are the foundation of God’s love and our love. I am draw to these because both of these concepts are deeply rooted in traditional Methodist beliefs and practices.

Personal holiness and social justice are two cornerstones of the Methodist tradition. This is true of many other traditions as well. While some have Methodist roots, in reality, it is what Jesus taught and practiced himself. As his faith matured a young John Wesley began to deeply explore his personal faith. Beginning in college as a part of what was known as the “Holy Club”, reading scripture and praying daily became central to Wesley’s faith or personal holiness. Later, as his methods spread and Methodism took root, he formed groups and classes that met primarily to hold one another accountable in their Christian walk of faith.

Wesley’s personal holiness led him out into the world, where he became aware of the plight of many: the illiterate, the poor, the imprisoned, the sick, the working class, the orphans, and the widows. He began to love these as Jesus would love them. Wesley became a vocal and financial champion of those in need of education, basic health care, safe working conditions, and the basic necessities of food and shelter. In many ways he was a social justice warrior. His personal holiness and intimate relationship with Jesus fueled his passion for social justice. Here he found the center of Christian love. May we do so as well.

Prayer: Lord God, guide me to grow closer and closer to Jesus, deeper and deeper into your love. In turn, lead me to apply your love of all people to my life and to the world. Amen.


Leave a comment

Dwelling Richly, Intimately

Reading: Psalm 27:1-6

Verse 4: “One thing I ask of the Lord, this is what I seek: that I may dwell in the house of the Lord all the days of my life.”

Photo credit: Matt Botsford

In this week’s Psalm David rejoices over God’s presence in his life and he expresses the desire to always be ‘at home’ in the Lord. With God, David finds light to guide him and salvation for his soul. With God David finds protection and shelter from his enemies. David’s end result in our verses for today is to “sing and make music to the Lord” – to worship God for all that God does for and is to David.

When David says, “One thing I ask of the Lord, this is what I seek: that I may dwell in the house of the Lord all the days of my life” he is expressing a deep desire to connect to God both physically and spiritually. The tabernacle (and later the temple) was literally seen as God’s dwelling place. Just as we go to our churches to connect to God, David desires to spend time in ‘God’s house.’ But one cannot realistically spend all of one’s time in the tabernacle or at church. Life and faith also happen outside the physical building.

When we are ‘at home’ with God, whether in our churches or in our homes or out in the mountains or walking the streets, that time with God fills us spiritually. When we “gaze upon” God’s beauty and when we “sacrifice with shouts of joy” we are living out our faith. Sometimes when we do these things we aren’t in church but are out in the world, engaging others and meeting needs. We are extending the light and salvation, the protection and shelter to others. We are sharing the love of God with a world in need. Doing so, “all the days of my life,” we are dwelling richly and intimately with God, “making music to the Lord.” Thanks be to God.

Prayer: Lord God, you fill me up. Pour me out as well. Your light dwells in my heart. Shine it out into the world. You are my salvation and my hope. Reflect your love into the lives of others so that they too may know your saving grace and your eternal presence. Amen.


Leave a comment

Everyday Life

Reading: Luke 9:37-43

Verse 42: “Jesus rebuked the evil spirit, healed the boy, and gave him back to his father.”

Coming down from the mountain Jesus, Peter, James, and John are met with a large crowd. Imagine the different things going through their minds. Jesus would be filled with confidence, assured by his conversation with Moses and Elijah, affirmed by the words God spoke. Peter, James, and John must have been in awe, seeing and understanding Jesus on a whole new level. Maybe their minds were reeling a little bit too!

From the crowd a man cries out, drawing Jesus’ attention. The father’s only son is possessed by an evil spirit. It causes seizures and convulsions. It “scarcely ever leaves him and it is destroying him.” The father is desperate. The disciples were unable to cast out the evil spirit so the man turns to Jesus. He was probably one of many waiting for Jesus to return. As the boy responds to Jesus’ invitation to come the evil spirit throws him to the ground. In verse 42 we read, “Jesus rebuked the evil spirit, healed the boy, and gave him back to his father.” The boy is made well. A father once again has a son. All were “amazed at the greatness of God.”

As wonderful as the mountaintop experience was for Jesus, Peter, James, and John and is for us when we experience these moments, the sharing of the good news happens in everyday life. Yes, we are changed on the mountain, but we live in the ordinary. Through prayer and the living out of our faith, through the example of Jesus Christ and the guidance of the Holy Spirit, we are called to minister to the needs of the world. We are called to feed the hungry, to clothe the naked, to heal the broken, to comfort the hurting, to pray for the oppressed, wartorn, and downtrodden. We are called to be Christ to the world. May it be so for us all.

Prayer: Lord God, rend my heart for what breaks yours. Use me to bring healing, wholeness, restoration… Use me to meet needs wherever and whenever I encounter them. Help me to follow Jesus’ example. Amen.


Leave a comment

See? Recognize? Heed?

Reading: Malachi 3: 1-4

Verse 1: “See, I will send my messenger, who will prepare the way before me.”

Photo credit: Chase Murphy

The prophet Malachi was sent by God to the Levites, the priests. They were offering imperfect animals on the altar – the blind, the diseased, the crippled. The priests had turned from God’s ways and had “caused many to stumble.” Malachi admonishes them and tells of a coming day of judgment. As I consider God’s case against the priests, I wonder what words Malachi would relay to us today. Is our offering similar to theirs? Do we give to God a portion dedicated up front or do we wait to the end of the month to see what we have left that we can spare? Do we always live an upright and holy life or do we fall into gossip circles and other sins that diminish our witness?

Beginning in chapter three God lays out the plan for change. The detestable and unfaithful behaviors will come to an end. In verse one the Lord Almighty says, “See, I will send my messenger, who will prepare the way before me.” About 400 years later the messenger will come. John the Baptist will offer a baptism of repentance, calling the people of God to a holy and faithful life. Although it is more comfortable and much easier to stay where we are at, to pretend that our faith is okay, to act as if we have no sin in our lives, the messenger draws crowds. John spoke to the hole in people’s hearts that only God can fill. Many came to confess and repent, to be baptized and cleansed. The people saw their imperfections and longed for a deeper, better, stronger faith. They saw their need and responded to the one preparing the way for the Lord.

Do we see our need for God? Do we recognize our imperfections? Are we willing to heed the words of the prophet? Will we humbly approach the Lord of mercy and grace, seeking to be made new again?

Prayer: Lord God, give me an honest walk of faith. Open my eyes to my areas of darkness and sin. Shine your light on my failures and imperfections. Pour out your grace and mercy, drawing me closer to you. Amen.


Leave a comment

Servant to All

Reading: Mark 9: 30-37

Verse 35: “If anyone wants to be first, he must be the very last, and the servant of all.”

Photo credit: K. Mitch Hodge

As we delve into Mark 9 today we look at one of the conflicts within all of us. On the one hand we want to be the best. We want recognition, titles, position, power. On the other hand Jesus calls us to be “servant of all.”

The disciples are not much different than we are. Walking along to road they argued about who was the greatest disciple. As kids we argued about who was the best player on the team and about who was smartest at math. As teens we argue about who is the coolest or about who has the best car, clothes… As adults we vie for promotions and titles. We try and demonstrate our success by the homes we live in, by the cars we drive… In our own ways we desire greatness, just like the disciples did.

Jesus knows what they were arguing about. He begins to counter this desire by saying, “If anyone wants to be first, he must be the very last, and the servant of all.” The radical, counter-cultural Jesus suggests another way. This “servant of all” approach is modeled by Jesus. This call to humble service is a call to always be humble, in all circumstances and with all people. It’d be easy to be humble standing on a basketball court with Michael Jordan. It’d be much harder to do so when staring at a kid who can’t tie his shoe, much less dribble a ball. In this illustration we’d love to find something, anything, that we could do for Jordan. Humility calls us to be equally if not more willing with the awkward kid. For Jesus, all meant all.

To serve all others is not always easy. To illustrate the depth of this call, Jesus gathers a child in his arms. He challenges the disciples to welcome children as he does. Jesus takes one who is an afterthought in most places in that society and elevates them to a place of full belonging and equality. The child represents the one with great needs who cannot care for themselves. More than just children would meet this description. To care for the least and the last always requires humility wrapped in a servant’s heart. Following Jesus’ example may we too strive to serve all.

Prayer: Lord God, help me to see and love as Jesus did. Help me to see, care for, and treat all people, regardless of who or what they are, as ones to love. Grant me both a humble heart and hands and feet willing to serve. Amen.


Leave a comment

Rebuking Jesus

Reading: Mark 8: 27-33

Verse 32: “Jesus spoke plainly about this, and Peter took him aside and began to rebuke him.”

As our time in Mark 8 begins today we walk along with Jesus. Along the way he asks the disciples who people say he is. They respond with Moses, Elijah, some other prophet. The general population sees Jesus as one sent by God. That much is revealed in the wisdom of his teachings and in the miracles he offers. Turning next to those who know him best Jesus asks, “Who do you say I am?” It is Peter who answers, “You are the Christ.” For those of us who know Jesus well, how would we respond to this question? Like Peter we too might name Jesus the Christ or the Messiah. Or we might say he is Lord, redeemer, Savior.

And sometimes we, like Peter, can demonstrate a clear lack of understanding or have a failure of faith just moments after proclaiming Jesus is Lord, Savior, Messiah… Jesus explains to the disciples that he will suffer and be rejected, that he will die, and that he will rise after three days. In verse 32 we read, “Jesus spoke plainly about this, and Peter took him aside and began to rebuke him.” Well, the end of Jesus’ ministry did not match Peter’s vision for what the Messiah should be.

All of what Jesus explained was necessary for Jesus to be the kind of Messiah we need and not just the kind we want. Who or what I want Jesus to be does not always align with who and what Jesus really is. When I’m in just the right mood, I too can begin to rebuke Jesus for not doing what I want or for letting me experience this thing I don’t want to. We have all gone down that road. We’ve all done what Peter did.

In those moments we too are guilty of having in mind “the things of the world” and not “the things of God”. In those moments we want our way, not God’s way. As we heard yesterday in James’ words, “this should not be.” As we continue in Mark 8 tomorrow, Jesus offers guidance in how it should be. As we go with Jesus today, may our walk be faithful and true.

Prayer: Lord God, you gave us the example of how to walk faithfully within God’s will and ways. When the voice of the world rises up, send your Holy Spirit to remind me of my call to follow you. Draw me into faithful discipleship. Amen.


Leave a comment

Faithful Responding

Reading: Proverbs 22: 8-9 and 22-23

Verses 22-23: “Do not exploit the poor… for the Lord will take up their cause.”

Photo credit: Spencer Davis

In our passage from Proverbs the focus remains in those with and those without. Care and concern for the poor and needy is a very common theme throughout the scriptures. In the Law are provisions for the least of these – laws about not harvesting every single head of grain so there was still some left for the needy and guidelines for welcoming in the alien and stranger in your midst. Verse nine illustrates well the understanding of this charge to care for those in need: “A generous man will himself be blessed, for he shares his food with the poor.” Blessings come from living out the heart of God.

Today we tend to see the care of the needy and poor one of two ways: that’s someone else’s job (either the governments or the pastors) or… here’s some money to help with that. Both approaches fail to comprehend the heart of God and the way we are called to truly care for those in need. Solomon did not say the generous man gave food to the poor. He shared his food with the poor. This implies sitting at the table together, sharing both food and time with one another. In a similar way the guidelines mentioned above implied opening your door and welcoming the other into your home to share in your generous hospitality. The heart of God is all about relationships and walking together with those that God places in our path and on our hearts.

In verses 22 and 23 we hear both a caution and a warning: “Do not exploit the poor… for the Lord will take up their cause.” The poor and needy tend to be powerless and voiceless. They are easy targets for some to take advantage of and for others to simply ignore. Jesus calls us to do just the opposite. In the parable of the Good Samaritan (Luke 10), for example, the plight of the man in need is the focus. The one who cared for the man in need is the one whom Jesus called us to “go and do likewise.” In our lives the voice or nudge of the Holy Spirit often reminds us of our call to care for such as these. This is the Lord taking up their cause. So when the Spirit speaks may we be faithful in responding to the need before us. Doing so we will not only bless the other but we will be blessed ourselves.

Prayer: Loving and compassionate God, your love for me is no more or no less than your love for my neighbor. Your care and concern for me is the same as your care and concern for the one far from you. Open my heart to live out these truths: all are loved, all are worthy and valued, all deserve to be cared for. With an open and willing heart, guide my hands and feet today. Amen.


Leave a comment

Careful and Wise

Reading: Ephesians 5: 15-20

Verse 15: “Be very careful, then, how you live – not as unwise but as wise, making the most of every opportunity”.

Photo credit: Aaron Burden

In today’s passage Paul touches on a very familiar theme in scripture: how one lives. The church in Ephasus was mostly made up of Gentiles. They would not have grown up in the church or in the Jewish faith. The ways of the world would be their norm. But as it had been since the first strokes of the Law were recorded in Moses’ day, God’s people were to be set apart or to be different from the world. Our passage today begins with these words: “Be very careful, then, how you live – not as unwise but as wise, making the most of every opportunity”.

Paul often contrasts wise lives with foolish living. The words he chose could very well have been ‘obedient’ versus ‘sinful’ or ‘godly’ versus ‘worldly’. Paul encourages those in the churches in and around Ephasus to “understand what the Lord’s will is”. For Paul this understanding will lead to wise or faithful or godly living. The Christian traits that Paul has been developing in chapters four and five are humility, gentleness, patience, forbearance, honesty, compassion, and forgiveness. When one lives out these traits in the world, others will be drawn to the faith. The world will be curious about the joy, love, peace, and hope shining out from the Christians they encounter. This attraction will allow us to make “the most of every opportunity” as we share our faith with a world in need.

Verse fifteen continues to speak to us today. To be wise in how we live covers so many areas. It has grown far beyond how we act at the bar on a Friday night or how we gossip at the local coffee shop. How we Christians act and represent ourselves on social media immediately comes to mind. Too many turn from posting a scripture quote to posts condemning or railing against this person or that group and then back to posting a cute little faith meme. If this is our practice then the value of our witness is quickly lost to the eyes of the world. The long-held critiques of Christianity are soon heard once again: hypocrite, judgmental, condemning…

My friends may we be careful in how we live. May we be wise and not unwise. Doing so we will be able to make the most of our opportunities to share and witness to the faith we live. May it be so.

Prayer: Lord God, help me to be wise in how I live, guiding me ever with the voice of the Holy Spirit. May the Spirit’s conviction draw me up short whenever I am tempted to speak or share unwise or hurtful things. Thank you, Lord. Amen.


Leave a comment

The Bread of Life

Reading: John 6: 24-35

Verse 27: “Do not work for food that spoils, but for food that endures to eternal life”.

Photo credit: Paz Arando

In our passage Jesus begins his words to the crowd pointing out the real reason that they have sought him out. They have come again for more food. In a time when most were subsistence farmers or basic laborers, where many experienced hunger and other affects of poverty regularly, it is natural to seek more food. In our time many people live with this same scarcity mentality, living day to day, just trying to get by. They too are attuned to opportunities to attain resources that aid in their survival.

The crowd has exerted effort to attain more food. They have crossed the lake in hopes of another meal. In his teaching Jesus invites them to more, not once but twice. In verse 27 Jesus says, “Do not work for food that spoils, but for food that endures to eternal life”. Jesus invites the crowd past the physical food that doesn’t last and on to the eternal food that does not perish. He invites them to consider a relationship with the Son of Man, to believe in Jesus. The crowd speaks of the manna that God gave daily for years in the desert, trying to revert back to their need for food and to their scarcity mentality. Jesus again points them past the physical food that God gave their ancestors and on to the “true bread” that stands before them and offers “life to the world”. Jesus again invites them to come through him and to believe in him. He promises that those who do will never hunger or thirst again.

Physical thirst and hunger exist in all of our communities, no matter how small. As followers of Jesus Christ we are called to meet these needs. Yes, yes, yes! Today’s passage also invites us to go deeper, to also connect people to the bread of life. How will you begin to do both of these things in your community today?

Prayer: Lord God, lead and guide me to meet needs both physical and spiritual. The needs are so great. Fill the fields with workers, Lord. Amen.