pastorjohnb

Thoughts and musings on faith and our mighty God!


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Share and Build

Reading: Revelation 21:1, John 13:31, and Acts 11:1

Rev. 21:1 – “Then I saw a new heaven and a new earth, for the first heaven and the first earth had passed away, and there was no longer any sea.”

There will be a day when this world is no more. On that day the new heaven and earth will be established and God will once again walk with humankind. Our Revelation text also tells us that the sea will be no more. At the beginning of time the sea represented chaos and disorder. It was a great unknown still in Jesus’ day. 1,500+ years later we still believed that if you went too far you came to the end and you dropped off into a forever of nothingness. Symbolically, in Revelation, no sea means an end to the chaos and disorder of this world and this life. Therefore, no more death, tears, crying, pain…

In our verse from Acts 11 we are reminded that the Gentiles received God’s word. ‘Gentile’ was a term that originally referred to all people who were outside of the Jewish faith. In time it came to represent all people living without a relationship with Jesus Christ. The idea that all people can receive the word of God was a grand opening of the faith. Anyone and everyone became potential disciples.

John 13:31 speaks of Jesus and God being glorified. This refers to Jesus being raised from the dead. Taken in the context of our Revelation and Acts verses, it reminds us that when we share the good news of Jesus Christ and lead others towards a relationship with Christ, then Jesus and God are glorified here too. Each step, each effort to include all people in the family of God, each inches us closer to the day of a new heaven and earth while also bringing more of that kingdom to this earth. May we seek to share and build the kingdom of God today and every day by glorifying Christ!

Prayer: Lord God, the day of a new heaven and earth will be glorious beyond imagination. It will be awesome! Use me today and every day to make this earth a little more like the one to come. Amen.


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Love as I Have…

Reading: John 21:9-14

Verse 12: “Jesus said to them, ‘Come and have breakfast.’ None of the disciples dared ask him, ‘Who are you?’ They knew it was the Lord.”

As we continue in John 21 today the disciples get to shore and they see a fire burning. On the fire are some fish and beside it is some bread. In verse 12 we read, “Jesus said to them, ‘Come and have breakfast.’ None of the disciples dared ask him, ‘Who are you?’ They knew it was the Lord.” Although uncommon to you and me, fish and bread were staples of the diet at this time. To them, this would be a “normal” breakfast – one they’d probably shared before.

In this scene, Jesus continues to love his disciples. He prepares and invites them to share in a meal with him. In the next verse we see that Jesus picks up the bread and gives it to them and that he did the same with the fish. The risen Christ continues to model the service and hospitality and humility that he modeled during his earthly life. It is in these actions that the disciples know it is Jesus. It is one more way of demonstrating “love one another as I have loved you.”

We too are called to follow this example. With our friends and family, with our neighbors and with strangers, we too are to practice service, hospitality, and humility. Jesus offered a simple meal to his friends. Certainly we can do this for others. If course there are other options – bring a plate of cookies or a loaf of homemade bread to the new neighbor or family, mow someone’s lawn, shovel someone’s driveway, offer a ride to an appointment or to the store, have someone over for coffee… There are many ways to practice loving and caring for others.

If the risen Savior of the world can make the effort to cook and share a meal, we certainly can do the same. May it be so.

Prayer: Lord God, show me how and when to practice loving service and genuine hospitality today. In doing so may another experience your love. Amen.


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Freedom in Christ

Reading: 2nd Corinthians 3:12-4:2

Verses 17-18: “Where the Spirit of the Lord is, there is freedom… We who with unveiled faces all reflect the glory of the Lord.”

Photo credit: Mitchel Lensink

Once we accept Jesus Christ as Lord and Savior we welcome the constant presence of the Holy Spirit into our hearts and lives. The presence of the Holy Spirit lifts the “veil” from our eyes, helping us to see ourselves as we truly are. This unimpeded vision opens our hearts to the reality of who and what we are as well as helping us see the world around us more clearly. The Spirit leads us to become more and more like Jesus both inside and outside.

The inner process of restoration and redemption is addressed in the two verses from chapter 4. We “renounce secret and shameful ways.” The pledge to be freed from sin is step 1. Then Paul calls believers to “set forth the truth plainly.” We do this two ways – one internal and one external. In our own lives we allow the word of God and the power of the Holy Spirit to conform us to the image of Christ. This refining and transforming process isn’t always easy. It requires work and sacrifice. As this work is being done in our lives we begin to live Jesus’ truths out in our world. We share Christ’s love, forgiveness, compassion, grace, peace… with others, revealing to them the glory of God.

In verses 17-18 we read these words: “Where the Spirit of the Lord is, there is freedom… We who with unveiled faces all reflect the glory of the Lord.” When we are filled with the Spirit we are free to live and love as Christ did. Without the limitations that this world tries to place on our love, kindness, and generosity we can live in ways that reflect God’s glory to others. By being freed from the cares and concerns of this world we live as witnesses to Jesus Christ. May it be so for you and for me.

Prayer: Lord God, unshackle me from the things of this world. Strip me of the pride and greed that so easily binds. Bind me instead to the way of love, to the way of Christ. Amen.


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Share the Encounter

Reading: Exodus 34:29-32

Verse 29: “When Moses came down from Mt. Sinai… his face was radiant because he had spoken with the Lord.”

Moses had gone up the mountain to be with God. During the forty days in God’s presence he talked with God and God once again gave Moses the Ten Commandments, the “words of the covenant.” After spending these days with God, Moses is changed. In our opening verse we read, “When Moses came down from Mt. Sinai… his face was radiant because he had spoken with the Lord.” Because of Moses’ time with God, he was changed. Moses’ face reflects his time in God’s glory. His heart was changed as well.

Even though the leaders and the people know where Moses has been, they are afraid when they see this physical change in Moses. If we encountered someone physically reflecting the glory of the Lord, would we too be scared? If we looked in the mirror after a time of intimacy with God and saw ourselves aglow, wouldn’t we be scared? We’d at least be taken aback. We too would need some coaxing to be comfortable enough to be in that presence or to look again in the mirror.

First the leaders come near to Moses and then the people do too. Once in Moses’ presence, he shares his experience with God. This time Moses shares the words that God explained and then wrote on the tablets of stone. When we have had an encounter with God – either because we intentionally sought God out or because God became present to us – do we seek to share our encounter with others? Do we share our experience with glory so that others can be blessed as well?

When we’ve had those encounters, when we come down the proverbial ‘mountain’, may we too share our experience. Speaking aloud our faith experience blesses others and can lead them to encounter the holy. May we ever share the journey with others, bearing witness to the glory of God.

Prayer: Lord, first draw me into your presence. Second, pour into me your wisdom, your love, your grace. Third, empower me to share as you share with me. Amen.


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Living a Kingdom Life

Reading: Luke 6:24-26

Verse 24: “Woe to you…”

Photo credit: Paz Arando

Finishing up in this week’s passage from Luke 6, we turn to the “woe” section of these Beatitudes. Each of these phrases begin with the statement, “Woe to you who are…” As was the case yesterday, there is deeper meaning in these words of Jesus. It is not necessarily “bad” to possess wealth or material goods. It is not necessarily a bad thing to laugh or to be spoken well of by others. But these become bad or detrimental to our faith when they become our focus in life, when they become the place we put our trust.

When we become focused on what others think and say about us, we tend to lose sight of other’s worth and value. We become very self-centered. The same is true when we chase and chase after wealth or possessions. We soon fail to see others needs. When we focus on laughing and enjoying life now, we become disconnected from the hurting world all around us. In the long term, these things never bring lasting contentment, joy, or peace. “More” and “better” are always calling.

Jesus warns us against focusing in on these earthly pleasures so that our gaze turns away from them and towards living out a kingdom life now. May we choose to use the gifts and blessings that God gives us to share God’s love and hope with a world in need.

Prayer: Lord God, help me to see my blessings and gifts not as something to just enjoy or even hoard, but as things to give away and to share. Allow these things to be used for the building of your kingdom in this time and place. Amen.


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God’s Grace

Reading: 1st Corinthians 15:9-11

Verse 10: “But by the grace of God I am what I am, and God’s grace to me was not without effect.”

Photo credit: Jon Tyson

As we continue today in 1st Corinthians 15 we get to the foundation of sharing and even of accepting the good news of Jesus Christ. In the years leading up to his conversion experience, Paul was the last one you’d ever expect to follow Jesus. Paul as Saul was the chief prosecutor of the church. Because of this past role, Paul identifies himself as the “least of the apostles.” Paul states that he doesn’t “deserve” to be called one. And yet here we are with Paul, one of the great missionaries of the early church.

He is right though: he didn’t deserve to be saved by Jesus. His past certainly did not earn him welcome into the church. Try as he might, Saul could not earn God’s love and favor through persecuting anything or anyone. The Lord met Saul where he was at – full of anger and hate and malice – and saved him by grace. Paul recognizes this: “But by the grace of God I am what I am, and God’s grace to me was not without effect.” Without grace Saul would’ve continued down his ugly path. But God’s grace – that acceptance and forgiveness driven by unconditional love – it rescued Paul. It saved Paul. It was not without effect: grace changed his life forever.

God’s grace continues to change lives. Day by day God’s grace works in you and me, changing us more and more into the image of God. Day by day God’s grace works in the lives of unbelievers, drawing them towards an encounter with Jesus Christ, savior of the world. Those saved by grace become like Paul, conduits of God’s grace. Practicing the grace that we too do not deserve yet receive in abundance, may we be sharers of the good news, bringing healing and transformation to our world.

Prayer: Lord God, I once was lost but now I have been found. I once was a sinner, but now I am a part of your family. Use me today to share this unconditional love and grace with others who are lost or are living in sin. May they too come to know your saving grace. Amen.


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The Light of the World

Readings: Isaiah 60:1-6 and Matthew 2:1-12

Verse 11: “On coming to the house, they saw the child with his mother Mary, and they bowed down and worshiped him.”

In our passage from Isaiah 60 we hear of a prophecy concerning the light that comes and rises over Israel. Isaiah predicts that people will come to see the source of the light, “the glory of the Lord.” He also mentions that gifts will be brought, “proclaiming the praise of the Lord.” Many years later, centuries in fact, a new star will rise in the night sky, drawing the attention of some scholars. They connect this star to an ancient prophecy from the Israelite Isaiah and they head off to meet this newborn king.

The magi end up in Jerusalem, the center of these people. Where else would a king be born? They inquire about where they can find “the one who has been born the king of the Jews”. Word of their inquiry filters up to Herod, the political king. Gathering information to soothe his disturbed mind, Herod sends the magi on their way, presumably to Bethlehem. Armed with an age range and a location, Herod plans to “visit” this child too. There will be no other king while Herod reigns. The magi head off to worship this king of the Jews.

As they go, the new star continues to guide them. Most likely they are led north, to Nazareth. The star’s light shines down on the home of Mary and Joseph. “On coming to the house, they saw the child with his mother Mary, and they bowed down and worshiped him.” Jesus was somewhere between infant and toddler by this point. The magi present gifts to the king – gold and frankincense and myrrh. Warned in a dream to avoid Herod, the magi depart for home another way. Herod will eventually pay a “visit” to find and eliminate this king. But that is a sad story for another day.

For today, we remember how God drew people from afar to worship Jesus, the king of the Jews. Since then people have been drawn to the light. You and I are part of that long line of faithful responders. Imagine for a moment the stories the magi took home! Then ponder: what is your story of meeting this king, this Lord of life? Then plan: how will you share the story, spreading the light of the Savior of the world?

Prayer: Lord God, fill me with joy today as I ponder the coming of the light into the world and into my life. Use me to reflect this light, drawing others to Jesus, our Lord and Savior. Amen.


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For the Praise of His Glory

Reading: Ephesians 1: 11-14

Verse 13: “And you were also included in Christ when you heard the word of truth, the gospel of your salvation.”

As we continue on in Ephesians today the theme of being chosen by God also continues. Today we hear of why we were chosen: “in conformity with the purpose of his will” so that we might live “for the praise of his glory.” God chose us with a purpose in mind. We are purposed to live out the hope that we find in Christ. We do this by offering our lives in service to God as we seek to minister to one another and to a broken world. As we walk in Jesus’ footsteps, loving as he did, we bring him the glory. Reflecting Jesus’ light and love to the world, he is praised.

When we are struggling to reflect Jesus – for whatever reason – we should remember the moment that we first invited Jesus to be the Lord of our life. That’s what verse 13 is all about: “And you were also included in Christ when you heard the word of truth, the gospel of your salvation.” Do you remember when you accepted Jesus, when you really understood the good news? How did knowing the salvation that Jesus offers change your life? When we reconnect with this experience and with these truths we are spurred on to live for his glory. Remembering our own salvation story encourages us to reflect Jesus to others so that they too can be included in Christ.

This idea of sharing our faith might feel scary or intimidating. Paul also reminds us today that we are not alone. We are “marked in him with a seal,” with the Holy Spirit, “a deposit guaranteeing our inheritance.” The Holy Spirit, this presence deposited in each of us, will lead and guide us as we seek to share our faith. The Spirit will point us in the right direction, will give us insights and words to say, will help us to understand the other person and their story. Working with the Holy Spirit, we will be empowered to share our faith and to draw others to Jesus Christ, all for the praise of his glory. May we ever lean into the Holy Spirit, the very presence of Christ in us.

Prayer: Lord, help me to trust more fully, to walk more steadfastly. Elevate the power of the Holy Spirit in my life so that all I do and say brings Christ the glory. Amen.


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Produce Fruit

Reading: Luke 3: 7-14

Verse 8: “Produce fruit in keeping with repentance.”

Our passage from Luke 3 is broken into two parts. Today we look at what it looks like to live out our faith in Jesus and tomorrow we look at who Jesus Christ is in our lives and in our world.

Today’s reading begins by addressing the reality of people’s faith. John asks the crowd, “Who warned you to flee from the wrath to come?” There is an implication that many in the crowd will be judged unworthy of the kingdom of God and that many are blissfully unaware of it. Today these would be the people who say “I’m a good person,” “I give to the red buckets at Christmas time,” “I grew up in a Christian home,” and so on. John says to the crowd that thinks they are “in,” “the ax is already at the root of the tree.” He explains that it does not matter if they claim to be a Jew or say they love God. Today these would be the people who say “I go to church once in a while” or “I pray every day.”

In verse eight John says, “Produce fruit in keeping with repentance.” He goes on to explain what this could look like: sharing our extra with those in need, being content with what we have, controlling our desires for power. For John, a personal relationship with God is not just some status we claim. It is a connection that impacts and changes all areas of our life. Repentance over and over shapes us more and more into the image of God. Experiencing God’s mercy, love, generosity, and compassion leads us to extend and share these things with others. This is producing fruit. May it be so for you and for me.

Prayer: Lord God, deepen our relationship this week. Deepen it so that I can love you and all I meet more fully, more completely. Refine me over and over to be more like you. Amen.


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Into All the World

Reading: Luke 3: 1-3

Verse 3: “He went into all the country around the Jordan, preaching a baptism of repentance for the forgiveness of sins.”

Today and tomorrow we focus on John the Baptist beginning to live into his call. It is something that he has probably heard about all of his life. At family gatherings, at birthdays, at Passover and other religious holidays that reflect on God’s saving power, in private moments with Zechariah and Elizabeth… John has heard and heard of the angel visits and of the words spoken over his life. John has heard again and again the story of how he leapt in the womb when he heard Mary’s voice. In about 29 AD John answers the call. We read, “He went into all the country around the Jordan, preaching a baptism of repentance for the forgiveness of sins.”

Luke lists the men in positions of power, both politically and religiously, in our passage today. The word of God does not go to them. It comes to John and he begins his ministry. John does not enter the halls or places of power but goes out into the area around the Jordan River. He preaches about living a holier life and the repentance necessary to live such a life. He preaches about the coming kingdom and what people must do to be a part of that kingdom. He preaches about being made right with God. What John the Baptist preaches isn’t easy to hear. But it is truth. And it is filled with hope and promise. Ears and hearts are eager to receive the words that John is sharing. It is good news.

Although the angels did not predict our births or speak to our parents about how we will fulfill our calls, we too have the same call as John the Baptist had. Jesus charged all disciples with the task of going to all people to proclaim the good news of Jesus Christ (Matthew 28: 19-20.) He did not say, ‘Go, hang out in the church and talk about me’. He said to go out into all the world. Like John hearing about his call, we too have heard over and over about the charge to go out to share the good news. For John, the call was to the region around the Jordan. For me, it is to the Piedmont Valley. Where is your place? To whom is God calling you?

Prayer: Lord, may I be faithful in sharing the good news in the places and with the people that you send me to. Amen.