pastorjohnb

Thoughts and musings on faith and our mighty God!


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Fasting Practice

Reading: Psalm 63:1-8

Verse 8: “My soul clings to you; your right hand upholds me “

Today’s Psalm is an expression of both longing for God and of praise for those intimate moments with God. David’s soul “thirsts” for God, especially in the times when David feels dry and weary. There is also recollections of moments when David has seen God’s power and glory. For these experiences he praises God with uplifted hands. Because of God’s help and presence, David sings “in the shadow of your wings.”

As you consider these thoughts from David, reflect on times in your life when you’ve longed for God in a “dry and weary land.” Reflect on times when you’ve been a witness to God’s power and glory. Take a few moments to offer a prayer of thanksgiving to God…

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Lent is a season where we are invited to look within, to seek to become more like Jesus Christ. Fasting is one means of helping us to practice these spiritual disciplines. To give up or abstain from something brings us face to face with our weakness and vulnerability. In that moment when we long for what we’ve given up we see our limits and our need for God. Admitting our inability to keep our commitment on our own leads us to a place of seeking God’s power to overcome. This is a scary place to willingly walk into. But it is also a place of honesty and clarity. From this place we can take steps to becoming closer to our Lord and Savior.

Fasting can lead us to a beautiful place – to a sacred space where we encounter ourselves and where we draw closer to the Lord. I invite you to consider the practice of fasting as a part of your Lenten journey.

Prayer: Lord God, the fast that you require is one that leads me away from self and deeper into your presence. Guide me on this journey. Draw me closer to who you created me to be. Amen.


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Rich and Beautiful

Reading: 1st Corinthians 12:1-11

Verse 11: “All these are the work of one and the same Spirit, and the Spirit gives them to each one, just as the Spirit determines.”

We return today to 1st Corinthians 12, where Paul lifts up some of the gifts that the Spirit gives. There are many other gifts or “fruit” of the Spirit – qualities or talents bestowed upon people, all to enhance or further the work of the body of Christ. As I wrote about earlier this week, all gifts were given for the “common good.” At the same time, though, the varieties of gifts can cause division instead of unity.

Division and factions seem to be the order of our day. If you are not on our side or of our opinion or just like us, then you are bad, the enemy, evil. As a people – not just as churches or denominations or even nations, but as a whole – humanity has digressed, regressed, become less than we used to be and certainly less than God designed us to be. Under the banner of individualism we’ve forgotten that we as truly so much better together. Under the hammer of tolerance we have grown blind to the fact that all people (no matter their color, gender, faith, wealth, education, vocation…) are valued and worthy and sacred.

In our homes, churches, and society is a rich and beautiful diversity. It is just as God designed, created, and drew into being: “Through Christ all things were made; without him nothing was made” (John 1:3). Who or what are we to see God’s creation and then to draw lines, barriers, dividers? Whether gifts, service, or activities, “All these are the work of one and the same Spirit, and the Spirit gives them to each one, just as the Spirit determines.” The Spirit works first in the way of love, leading out as Jesus led out. As followers of this Jesus, may we too use our gifts and talents to build each other up, to draw outsiders in, to let all people know they are loved by God and by those who walk in Jesus’ footsteps.

Prayer: Lord God, first gives me clearer eyes and a heart of love. Then create in me a more committed servant’s heart. Lastly, send me out into the world with a renewed love, using the gifts and talents that your Spirit blessed me with to be love poured out. Amen.


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Imagine

Reading: Mark 10: 13-16

Verse 15: “Anyone who will not receive the kingdom of God like a little child will never enter it.”

As our passage opens, people are trying to bring their children to Jesus and the disciples are stopping them. The disciples must have thought the children unworthy of Jesus’ time or that his time could be better spent with more pressing needs. We read that Jesus was “indignant” with what they are doing. Jesus is upset by the inferior treatment that the children are receiving. He corrects the disciples’ behavior with these words: “Let the little children come to me… for the kingdom of God belongs to such as these.” Why does the kingdom of God belong to “such as these?”

Children are innocent – they don’t see color or know prejudice or stereotypes. Children are pure – they haven’t learned to be selfish and they want to get along with everyone. Children are vulnerable – they need feel a sense of belonging and to feel loved. Children are dependent – they rely on others to care for them, to protect them, to guide them. What if we entered our relationship with God from this perspective? What if we came into worship, into times of prayer, into times of study and meditation without biases and judgment, with a longing to belong and to feel loved, and with a willingness to be guided by the Holy Spirit? Imagine how different our life of faith would be! In verse fifteen we read, “Anyone who will not receive the kingdom of God like a little child will never enter it.” Is our worship, our prayer life, our other times with God as rich and powerful when we enter with our expectations and our other adult baggage? It is not.

As we approach God and the kingdom work that God places before us today, may we do so with an innocence and a realization of our deep need for God in our lives. Doing so we will be held and blessed by Jesus.

Prayer: Lord God, what a beautiful way to think about our approach to faith. To really enter into time with you as a child would – needy for your attention, presence, guidance, love… Help me to simply come to you, open to all you have to offer. Amen.


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Imagine

Reading: Mark 10: 13-16

Verse 15: “Anyone who will not receive the kingdom of God like a little child will never enter it.”

As our passage opens, people are trying to bring their children to Jesus and the disciples are stopping them. The disciples must have thought the children unworthy of Jesus’ time or that his time could be better spent with more pressing needs. We read that Jesus was “indignant” with what they are doing. Jesus is upset by the inferior treatment that the children are receiving. He corrects the disciples’ behavior with these words: “Let the little children come to me… for the kingdom of God belongs to such as these.” Why does the kingdom of God belong to “such as these?”

Children are innocent – they don’t see color or know prejudice or stereotypes. Children are pure – they haven’t learned to be selfish and they want to get along with everyone. Children are vulnerable – they need feel a sense of belonging and to feel loved. Children are dependent – they rely on others to care for them, to protect them, to guide them. What if we entered our relationship with God from this perspective? What if we came into worship, into times of prayer, into times of study and meditation without biases and judgment, with a longing to belong and to feel loved, and with a willingness to be guided by the Holy Spirit? Imagine how different our life of faith would be! In verse fifteen we read, “Anyone who will not receive the kingdom of God like a little child will never enter it.” Is our worship, our prayer life, our other times with God as rich and powerful when we enter with our expectations and our other adult baggage? It is not.

As we approach God and the kingdom work that God places before us today, may we do so with an innocence and a realization of our deep need for God in our lives. Doing so we will be held and blessed by Jesus.

Prayer: Lord God, what a beautiful way to think about our approach to faith. To really enter into time with you as a child would – needy for your attention, presence, guidance, love… Help me to simply come to you, open to all you have to offer. Amen.


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A Beautiful Vision

Reading: Ephesians 4:25 – 5:2

Verses 1 and 2: “Be imitators of God… and live a life of love”.

Photo credit: Freestocks

Looking at this passage yesterday we saw how Satan is at work, ever seeking to plant seeds of evil in our hearts. These seeds can bear fruit if allowed to take root. When these lies and temptations manifest themselves we exhibit “bitterness, rage and anger, brawling and slander” – just to name a few. These behaviors damage our relationships with God and with one another. They foster disunity and discord and division.

Paul offers a better way in verse 32: “Be kind and compassionate… forgiving each other as Christ in God forgave you”. Even while calling us to more, Paul also acknowledges the struggle. Being human we will and do fail, we do harm one another. Paul reminds us that forgiveness is also an essential part of our relationship with each other just as it is in our relationship with God.

Paul summarizes his encouragement in chapter five, verses one and two: “Be imitators of God… and live a life of love”. This is such a high calling, such a beautiful vision of what a Christ-follower should be. Like God we should care for one another, serve one another, provide for one another, protect one another, teach one another, comfort one another… And like Christ we should live a life of love – investing in others, having mercy and grace for others, entering into authentic relationship with one another, being a “fragrant offering” for one another. What a beautiful vision. May we seek to share our faith and these practices today and every day.

Prayer: Lord God, to imitate you and to love like Christ – wow. Although this seems overwhelming I know that it is what you desire from me. Day by day shape me more and more into this vision. Amen.


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Unity in Christ Jesus

Reading: Ephesians 2: 11-22

Verse 13: “But now in Christ Jesus you who were once far way have been brought near through the blood of Jesus”.

Returning to Ephesians today our focus moves past tearing down walls to the purpose of doing so. Without walls or barriers in place, greater unity is possible. Think of a house remodel. Without some of the old walls a new and open space is created. People in the new space can see and talk and relate to one another in a better way. Yet ‘open concept’ living has its limits too. None of us wants a bathroom without walls (or without a door!)

Paul reminds the church of what they once were – two peoples. For the Gentiles, that meant that they were separated from Jesus Christ. They were “foreigners”, without the covenant promise and without hope. But all that changed. In verse thirteen we read, “But now in Christ Jesus you who were once far way have been brought near through the blood of Jesus”. Through his blood Jesus made a way for all people to live and be in right relationship with God. Doing so, he reconciled Jew and Gentile, preaching peace and blessing all who believed with the gift of the one Holy Spirit.

Uniting all believers with the same Holy Spirit, Jesus Christ made the foreigners into “citizens”, creating a new “holy temple”, a church for all people. Jew and Gentile would now be “built together”, becoming the dwelling place of God who “lives by the Spirit”. What a beautiful vision of faith and love, of community and hope! May we each do all we can to build and be such a church in our time and space. May it be so.

Prayer: Lord God, thank you for making all believers one through the indwelling Holy Spirit. By sharing this common core we are all part of Christ’s universal body. In and through that Spirit, continue to draw us together Lord. Amen.


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Unity in Christ Jesus

Reading: Ephesians 2: 11-22

Verse 13: “But now in Christ Jesus you who were once far way have been brought near through the blood of Jesus”.

Returning to Ephesians today our focus moves past tearing down walls to the purpose of doing so. Without walls or barriers in place, greater unity is possible. Think of a house remodel. Without some of the old walls a new and open space is created. People in the new space can see and talk and relate to one another in a better way. Yet ‘open concept’ living has its limits too. None of us wants a bathroom without walls (or without a door!)

Paul reminds the church of what they once were – two peoples. For the Gentiles, that meant that they were separated from Jesus Christ. They were “foreigners”, without the covenant promise and without hope. But all that changed. In verse thirteen we read, “But now in Christ Jesus you who were once far way have been brought near through the blood of Jesus”. Through his blood Jesus made a way for all people to live and be in right relationship with God. Doing so, he reconciled Jew and Gentile, preaching peace and blessing all who believed with the gift of the one Holy Spirit.

Uniting all believers with the same Holy Spirit, Jesus Christ made the foreigners into “citizens”, creating a new “holy temple”, a church for all people. Jew and Gentile would now be “built together”, becoming the dwelling place of God who “lives by the Spirit”. What a beautiful vision of faith and love, of community and hope! May we each do all we can to build and be such a church in our time and space. May it be so.

Prayer: Lord God, thank you for making all believers one through the indwelling Holy Spirit. By sharing this common core we are all part of Christ’s universal body. In and through that Spirit, continue to draw us together Lord. Amen.


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The True Kingdom

Reading: John 10: 16-18

Verse 17: “The reason my father loves me is that I lay down my life”.

We turn to John 10 for a second day in a row. Yesterday we were drawn to consider the present reality of God’s kingdom here on earth and to consider how we are each working to include others in said kingdom. Today we focus in on the how and the who of our task to draw others into the kingdom of God.

For Jesus, the how was laying down his life. Jesus did this literally, going to the cross to defeat the power of sin and then to and out of the grave to defeat the power of death. This obedient, sacrificial action reflects both Jesus’ love for God and for us. In turn, it draws God’s love and our love too. While we may not go as far as Jesus did with our obedient and sacrificial actions, we can certainly expect to be called upon to pay a cost as we seek to share the love of God with others. It may be financial, physical, emotional, relational. The ‘how’ will almost always involve giving something for or to the other. While this is often difficult, the real ‘who’ is harder.

When we consider Jesus’ ‘who’, is general they were Jews. The people Jesus spoke with and ministered to were often much like Jesus himself. This too is our general mission field – those we work with, associate with, maybe go to school with. Jesus also welcomed and engaged those from the edges and fringes – those society and formal religion rejected or avoided. Herein lies our real challenge. We like the neat and ordered, the understandable and routine. Our churches like these things too. But for the kingdom of God to be fully revealed, it must reflect our actual communities, in all of their beautiful diversity. To realize this we must be willing to engage and welcome those outside of our normal circles. We must be willing to be uncomfortable and unsure of the places and people we seek to connect with – only in these thin spaces will we really rely on the Holy Spirit to lead and guide us. Only then will the margins and fringes be wiped away by the love of God, opening our community of faith to reflect the true kingdom of God here on earth.

Prayer: Loving God, it’s easy to call upon or engage those like me, those inside the church. It is much harder to engage and love those who are not like me. Give me a willing spirit and a deeper trust in you. Go with me Holy Spirit. Amen.


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Rejoice and Rest

Reading: Psalm 23

Verse 5: “You anoint my head with oil; my cup overflows”.

Photo credit: Ronnie Khan

The words we read today are such familiar words. When one hears, “The Lord is my shepherd”, we are brought immediately to a good and sacred place. The Psalm speaks of our relationship with God throughout all of life’s joys and trials. These words of David bring us comfort and strength, assurance and guidance, blessing and presence.

Our good shepherd is not a distant holiness that is non-committal. God is right here, right now. When we are weary, God makes us lie down and brings us restoration. God walks with us, ever guiding us in all righteousness. In those moments or seasons of pain and grief, God is present in the valley. When fear arises, God comforts us. Even in the presence of our enemies God anoints us with the oil of blessing. In the presence of our enemies, the rivers of God’s love and mercy and grace can still make a way. Filling our lives here with goodness and love, God will also one day welcome us to dwell in his forever home too. What beautiful words and thoughts.

Today may we rejoice in the love of the good shepherd. Today may we rest in his presence.

Prayer: Lord, your love is so incredible. You are our all in all – present when we are weak and strong, loving us when we please you and when we fail. Thank you, Lord! Amen.


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In His Light

Reading: Psalm 4

Verse 8: “I will lie down and sleep in peace, for you alone, O God, make me dwell in safety”.

David begins Psalm 4 seeking God, pleading with God. He shifts to righteous living in the middle verses. Today we focus in on the last few verses. For those seeking false gods, David asks God to “let the light of your face shine upon us”. Remind us, O God, that you are still right here. Remind us, O God, of your wonderful presence. When God’s light shines in the world, people are drawn towards the light.

God’s light shines in many ways. Sometimes it is in a sunset or sunrise. Sometimes it is in a delicate flower or in a newborn baby. Sometimes it is in the acts of kindness or words of compassion or forgiveness that we share with one another. Sometimes it is in the hymn or song we sing or it is in the words of life spoken or read. In each of these, and in many more ways, God’s light shines, reminding us and others of his presence in our hearts and in our world.

The last two verses speak of the life of faith. In verse seven David shares that God has “filled my heart” with great joy – a joy even greater than at harvest time. The joy found in a life lived in right relationship with God is abundant and generous, as with the God of a great harvest. In verse eight David writes, “I will lie down and sleep in peace, for you alone, O God, make me dwell in safety”. This speaks of the contentment, the trust, the assurance, the peace that comes from walking with the Lord. Knowing that God is our all in all, there is nothing that this world can bring that is bigger, stronger, or more powerful than our God. There is nothing that can separate us from the love and light of God. In his light we dwell in eternal safety. Thanks be to God.

Prayer: God of light and love, your presence and your love surround me. You go before me, you hem me in. When I wake you are there. When I lie down you are there. Guide me by and in the light of your love. Amen.