pastorjohnb

Thoughts and musings on faith and our mighty God!


Leave a comment

Being the Light

Reading: Isaiah 9: 2-7

Verse 6: “For to us a child is born, to us a son is given… He will be called Wonderful Counselor, Mighty God, Everlasting Father, Prince of Peace.”

We begin our Christmas Eve with a word of hope from Isaiah 9. The prophet speaks of a day to come – of a day when war will be no more and when rejoicing will come with the harvest. Later today in many churches we will hear from Luke 2. Angels and shepherds, Mary and Joseph, a manger and a baby – these will be our focus later today.

In verse two Isaiah writes, “The people walking in darkness have seen a great light.” For those living in captivity during Isaiah’s day, these words give hope. By Jesus’ time the oppressor was different, but the people still longed for a day when Isaiah’s words would come true. John the Baptist had put people on alert. They were ready to return to God and to a holy way of living. Today there are other forms of darkness that people struggle in. Poverty, prejudice, addiction, abuse, favoritism, injustice, and homelessness are just a few of the forms of darkness in our world. Grief, loss, illness, and broken relationships are others. In verse four Isaiah promises that God will “shatter the yoke that burdens them.” God desires a world of love and peace, of hope and joy. In verse six we read of the first step in healing the brokenness and pain and sin of the world.

In verse six we read, “For to us a child is born, to us a son is given… He will be called Wonderful Counselor, Mighty God, Everlasting Father, Prince of Peace.” Today we celebrate this birth, this light coming into the darkness of the world. Each week leading up to today we have lit the candles of peace, hope, joy, and love – reminding ourselves of how Jesus lived in the world. Today we light the Christ candle, reminding ourselves that Jesus was and is the light of the world. As light drives away darkness, the war within each of us ceases and heaven rejoices at the harvest of the righteous. Jesus lived in righteousness, bringing justice as he drove away the evils and hurt of this world. As he prepared to return to heaven, Jesus gave his followers a commission: go and make disciples, go and transform lives. Go and be the light in their darkness, bringing love and peace, hope and joy. This is step two of God’s plan to heal and restore a broken world. It is you and me being the light of Jesus Christ. May we be the light.

Prayer: Lord God, you took on flesh and came to reveal how to live love, peace, hope, and joy out in the world. Use me each day to bring light into the darkness of this world. Amen.


1 Comment

Helping Others

Reading: Luke 10: 46-52

Verse 51: “The blind man said, ‘Rabbi, I want to see.'”

Jesus stops as the cries of blind Bartimaeus reaches his ears. He tells the crowd to call him here. Bartimaeus throws off his cloak, jumps up, and comes to Jesus. He is excited because Jesus has heard him, has stopped, and is focusing on him. Imagine how the blind man’s heart was racing at this moment!

Once he navigates his way to Jesus, a simple question is asked: “What do you want me to do for you?” But before we get to Bartimaeus’ response, I wonder what was going through the crowd’s minds. What were those who had tried to hush up Bartimaeus thinking and feeling? Were the hushers still hard of heart? What were others in the crowd with illnesses or hardships thinking and feeling? Were these others who lived on the fringes suddenly hopeful?

Bartimaeus simply says, “I want to see.” He is asking Jesus to remove this barrier, this limitation. He wants to experience life in a fuller, new way. Many of us look the Jesus in this way. For some it is for a physical healing. For some it is for healing from an addiction or a harmful relationship. For some it is to be healed of our sin and to be made right again. The darkness that we are all in from time to time leads us all to cry out to Jesus.

The blind man is healed with a word from Jesus. His faith in Jesus brings him healing. Bartimaeus’ response is a joyful one – he follows Jesus as they head down the road. He wants to be a part of this energy, of this movement. This too is how we should respond to Jesus’ healing and saving touch. Following in his footsteps, sharing the good news, helping others to see and walk in the light – may this be our grateful response to Jesus!

Prayer: Lord God, how often have you healed me from my brokenness, how often have you restored me to right relationship with you and with others in my life. Help me to follow as Bartimaeus did, leading others toward the healer, the redeemer, the rock. Amen.


Leave a comment

Shout It

Reading: Mark 10: 46-52

Verse 48: “Many rebuked him and told him to be quiet, but he shouted out all the more, ‘Jesus, son of David, have mercy on me!'”

Throughout the gospels Jesus takes time often to interact with those on the margins and fringes of society. These acts of kindness and mercy built up his popularity. I’d imagine almost everyone had heard of Jesus and of the amazing teachings and healings that came from him. After spending some time in Jericho, Jesus and the disciples are leaving the city to continue their ministry. There is a new destination ahead.

Bartimaeus is blind, not deaf or mute. He hears a crowd coming along the road and he surmises that Jesus is passing by. Bartimaeus shouts out to get Jesus’ attention. But in verse 48 we read, “Many rebuked him and told him to be quiet.” The people around him want to quiet Bartimaeus. What would possibly lead people to prevent a man from potential healing? What would lead them to try and keep him in his disabled state? Sometimes we like to have people below us in society. They make us feel better about ourselves. Sometimes we don’t want the down and out to shout aloud – it reminds us of our call to care for the least of these. Sometimes we prefer for those in the margins and fringes to stay there. When they draw attention to their cause we become uncomfortable because the injustice or oppression or abuse tugs at our hearts, prompting us towards action.

Ignoring those around him, those trying to quiet him for whatever reason, Bartimaeus “shouted out all the more, ‘Jesus, son of David, have mercy on me!'” In faith he seems the one that can heal him. In that same faith may we call out when we are in need, especially when we choose to be blind or mute or deaf to the ills and struggles around us. In that same faith may we choose to walk with and to support those in need of Jesus, our healer, our hope, our redeemer. In faith may it be so.

Prayer: Lord God, use me as a voice for the weak and powerless, for the outcast and marginalized. Make me quick to recognize their needs and steady to respond in love and compassion. As you have blessed me may I be a blessing to others. Amen.


Leave a comment

Generous and Loving

Reading: Mark 7: 31-37

Verse 32: “There some people brought to him a man who was deaf and could hardly talk, and they begged him to place his hand on the man.”

Photo credit: Matt Botsford

In today’s passage Jesus heads back towards the Sea of Galilee. As he enters the region known as the Decapolis he encounters some family and/or friends of a man in need of healing. Jesus is still in Gentile lands. The Decapolis was a league of ten cities that united for protection against Israel’s dominance. With the current Roman occupation there wasn’t much need to withstand Israel. Yet tensions remained high between the Jews and Gentiles. Even so, a family member’s or friend’s needs rise above these barriers or obstacles. In verse 32 we read, “There some people brought to him a man who was deaf and could hardly talk, and they begged him to place his hand on the man.” One with the ability to heal is present. Jesus must see this man. As only Jesus could do, he heals the man. The people are overwhelmed with amazement.

The man in need did not have to do anything. The one with something to give gave. This person in need was given what he lacked – the ability to hear and speak. The concept of the one who has caring deeply for the one without is deeply rooted in the scriptures. Jesus does not see this man as a Gentile but as a beloved and valued child of God. As was the case up the road in Tyre, Jesus offers what he can to the one in need. Note that there are no strings attached. The man did not have to first profess faith in Jesus. He did not have to become a Jew first. There were no expectations laid out beforehand for life after the miracle. This too is a good lesson for us all.

To share what we have been blessed or gifted with, to offer it without conditions or expectations in return – this is the heart of the gospel, the heart of what it means to love our neighbors. As we walk this journey of faith, may we be so generous and so loving that others see Christ in us.

Prayer: Lord God, your heart for all people is again revealed in today’s passage. There were no “but…” or “first you must…” demands. Jesus simply gave what he had. Shape my heart into this kind of heart. Amen.


Leave a comment

Even the Dogs

Reading: Mark 7: 24-30

Verse 28: “Yes, Lord, but even the dogs under the table eat the children’s crumbs.”

Photo credit: Charles Deluvio

At the start of our passage Jesus and the disciples travel to Tyre, a city along the coast north of Israel. Jesus is looking for some rest as they enter a house hoping no one notices. Yet even in this Gentile land the rumors of Jesus have crept in. Scholars believe that some from this region would have traveled to see this Jesus. Because of all this, “he could not keep his presence secret.” A woman, a Gentile, comes and falls at his feet, begging Jesus to heal her demon-possessed little daughter.

While on an attempted getaway someone wants Jesus to be Jesus, the Son of God, the healer. We’ve all been interrupted on vacation. We know what it is like. Add in the inherent cultural bias present in almost all Jew-Gentile interaction and this was a hard request for Jesus to receive. After all, he was partly human. In an attempt to dismiss her, Jesus says these words: “First let the children eat all they want”. He came to save the lost sheep of Israel, the children of God, the chosen ones. Let him care for them first. To add haste to her possible departure, Jesus continues, saying, “for it is not right to take the children’s bread and toss it to their dogs.” The Jewish-Gentile antagonism that was all around Jesus slips out of his lips as he calls her and her people a “dog.” The Jews saw the Samaritans and others from the north as half-breeds and often called them dogs or worse.

We’ve all been really tired and in need of rest. We’ve all been interrupted when it was annoying or inconvenient or frustrating or… Some of those times I have not been the most gracious. I have said things or responded in ways that I am not proud of. Perhaps you have too. I think Jesus did this day. But the woman’s belief in Jesus as the healer and her love for her daughter is greater. The dismissive words and the insult do not deter her. She says, “Yes, Lord, but even the dogs under the table eat the children’s crumbs.” But you can heal my daughter. But you are here right now. But even us Gentiles deserve a little bit of God’s mercy.

Jesus is moved. For such faith the daughter is healed. He tells her to go home, the demon is gone. It is as Jesus said as the woman returns to her daughter. As we will also see later in the week, Jesus was not just for the Jews or is not just for Christians today. His love and care extends to the ends of the earth, covering all people in his grace. The challenge for us as followers of Jesus Christ is to allow the Spirit to work within us too, leading us to love as Jesus loved. May it be so – even when we are tired, even when the other isn’t ‘ours’ or isn’t just like us!

Prayer: Lord God, give me the strength and the courage to love well, no matter the situation, no matter how I feel. Always fill me with your love and grace so that I have plenty to offer. Amen.


Leave a comment

Run to Meet Jesus

Reading: Mark 6: 53-56

Verse 56: “They begged him to let them touch even the edge of his cloak, and all who touched him were healed”.

Photo credit: Sarah Berriman

Once again as the boat lands, a crowd gathers. Mark tells us that the people “ran throughout that whole region” as they rushed to bring the sick to wherever Jesus was. As Jesus traveled to villages or towns and as he was simply out in the countryside, crowds of people came to Jesus. In these ongoing encounters, Jesus remains compassionate and loving, meeting all people as they were and where they were at. He welcomed one and all.

Jesus continues to meet us as we are and where we are at in life. He meets us when we are tired and worn. He meets us in the joys and celebrations. Jesus meets us when we feel all alone and when we gather for worship or study or prayer. He meets us wherever and whenever. In verse 56 we read that those who came “begged him to let them touch even the edge of his cloak”. They knew that even such a brief encounter would bring healing and wholeness. All were healed.

Jesus continues to meet us as we are and where we are. This day may we too run to meet Jesus. There we can find healing and wholeness, compassion and love.

Prayer: Lord God, your love astounds me. No matter how I am when I come to you, you love me. Your compassion amazes me. No matter what I’ve done, you welcome me into your presence. There you cover me in your grace and peace, making me whole again. Thank you, Lord. Amen.


Leave a comment

Run to Meet Jesus

Reading: Mark 6: 53-56

Verse 56: “They begged him to let them touch even the edge of his cloak, and all who touched him were healed”.

Photo credit: Sarah Berriman

Once again as the boat lands, a crowd gathers. Mark tells us that the people “ran throughout that whole region” as they rushed to bring the sick to wherever Jesus was. As Jesus traveled to villages or towns and as he was simply out in the countryside, crowds of people came to Jesus. In these ongoing encounters, Jesus remains compassionate and loving, meeting all people as they were and where they were at. He welcomed one and all.

Jesus continues to meet us as we are and where we are at in life. He meets us when we are tired and worn. He meets us in the joys and celebrations. Jesus meets us when we feel all alone and when we gather for worship or study or prayer. He meets us wherever and whenever. In verse 56 we read that those who came “begged him to let them touch even the edge of his cloak”. They knew that even such a brief encounter would bring healing and wholeness. All were healed.

Jesus continues to meet us as we are and where we are. This day may we too run to meet Jesus. There we can find healing and wholeness, compassion and love.

Prayer: Lord God, your love astounds me. No matter how I am when I come to you, you love me. Your compassion amazes me. No matter what I’ve done, you welcome me into your presence. There you cover me in your grace and peace, making me whole again. Thank you, Lord. Amen.


Leave a comment

One Life at a Time

Reading: Mark 6: 7-13

Verse 7: “He called the twelve and began to send them out two by two”.

Returning to Mark 6 today, we see that Jesus leaves Nazareth after being rejected and continues to teach in other villages. With the rejection of Nazareth probably still fresh in their minds, Jesus “called the twelve and began to send them out two by two”. Jesus gives them authority and sends them out to proclaim the kingdom of God. He instructs them to rely on the good will and compassion of those who will receive the good news. They are not to take any money, any extra clothes, any provisions or food.

Jesus sends them out to do what he could not do in Nazareth. But he does send them out with this advice: if anyone or anywhere rejects you, just move on. “Shake the dust off” and move on. Yes, some will receive the good news and others will reject it. Jesus tells the disciples not to worry about that but to simply keep on with the preaching and healing. In other words, do what you’re being sent to do. Proclaim the good news of the coming kingdom.

As I reflect on this passage, it occurs to me that this too is our charge. In many ways we are like these disciples that were sent out into the world. As disciples of Jesus Christ we too are called to share the good news of the kingdom of God. As modern believers, we too must press on. As we do so, some will reject us, others will be intrigued. Some will come to faith in Jesus, some will not hear a word we say. Just as it was with the first disciples, success or failure does not change our charge. Whatever may come, may we ever strive to share the good news of Jesus Christ with a world and a people in need, transforming our world one life at a time. May it be so for you and for me.

Prayer: Lord God, whether by word or deed use me to build your kingdom here on earth. Help be day by day to share the good news of my Lord and Savior, Jesus Christ. Amen.


Leave a comment

Steadfast and Eternal

Reading: Mark 5: 35-43

Verse 36: “Don’t be afraid; just believe”.

Photo credit: Aron Visuals

Today we again pick up the story of Jairus and his daughter. The woman with the 12-year condition has been healed. It is now almost time to continue on so that Jesus can attend to Jairus’ daughter. But just as Jesus finishes speaking to the woman, men from Jairus’ house arrive to tell him, “Your daughter is dead”. In immediate response, “ignoring what they said”, Jesus says to Jairus, “Don’t be afraid; just believe”. We hear of no response or reaction from Jairus. He, Jesus, and Peter, James, and John leave everyone else behind and proceed to the house. Was Jairus still hopeful? Did he still believe in Jesus’ power? Was he just numbly walking along?

Arriving at the house, the mourning is already well under way. Preparations for death had been made. Clearing the house, Jesus takes Jairus and his wife plus Peter, James, and John to the little girl’s room. Taking her hand, Jesus calls her back to life. Immediately the daughter stands up and begins to walk around. Like the woman, she is completely healed, fully restored. Whatever had been killing the girl is totally gone. Jairus’ plea for help and all of the prayers lifted for this girl and her family are answered. Resisting fear and holding onto belief brings life to his little daughter.

The woman is healed. The daughter brought back to life. Does faith always lead to a good outcome? Does resisting fear always hold off grief or the time of trial? No, not always. Life will still happen – illness persists, death is final. Yet God is both of these too – steadfast and eternal. Trusting in God and believing that he is always in control is our strength in the storm. God can do the impossible. May we walk in faith, ever standing upon our steadfast and eternal God.

Prayer: Lord God, you are ever with me in the highs and lows plus all the places in between. May I be as true to you, O Lord. Amen.


Leave a comment

Daughter

Reading: Mark 5: 24b-34

Verse 28: “If I just touch his clothes, I will be healed”.

Photo credit: Elia Pelligrini

A great crowd follows Jesus and Jairus as they make their way to the synagogue leader’s home. They are focused on Jairus’ dying daughter. In the crowd is a woman who has been bleeding for twelve years. The nonstop flow of blood has a huge impact on her. She has been living on the fringes of society – always ceremonially unclean. In the excitement of the moment she is able to slip into the crowd. She is among people again. But her focus is singular. Jesus is present. She is drawn to get to him. She thinks, “If I just touch his clothes, I will be healed”. Is it faith or hope or desperation that draws her to Jesus? Or is it some of all three?

Suddenly the great crowd grinds to a halt. The woman worked her way to Jesus and touches his cloak. She is immediately healed – fully, completely, totally. Jesus knows that someone has drawn power and healing from him. The woman approaches, trembling in fear, falling at his feet. She tells the truth of what has happened, all of it. How does this all-powerful and holy one react to being touched by an outcast, by an unclean woman? He says to her, “Daughter, your faith has healed you. Go in peace and be freed from your suffering”. Daughter, welcome home. Daughter, glad to finally meet you. Daughter, peace be with you.

Who do I know that lives on the fringes? Who is there that I don’t even know? Who are these for you? What son or daughter of God feels outside the family of faith? May we seek ways to connect them to the healer. Whether touching them with words, with an act of kindness, with an invitation, may we share our Jesus with them.

Prayer: Lord God, guide me today to share my Jesus with one who feels far from you. Use me however you will to connect them to the healer’s touch. Amen.